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News stories that flew under the radar. Impress your friends with your knowledge of important events that were eclipsed by Trump's tweets, the 2020 election or the latest mass shooting. || News Plexus LLC — delivering your news in a convenient, AD-FREE and easy-to-read stream.

News stories that flew under the radar. Impress your friends with your knowledge of important events that were eclipsed by Trump's tweets, the 2020 election or the latest mass shooting. || News Plexus LLC — delivering your news in a convenient, AD-FREE and easy-to-read stream.
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NewsPlexus Media February 25, 2020

Mars lander confirms quakes, even aftershocks on red planet
NASA's newest Mars lander has confirmed that quakes and even aftershocks are regularly jolting the red planet. Scientists reported Monday that the seismometer from the InSight spacecraft has detected scores of marsquakes.
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NewsPlexus Media February 24, 2020

Columbus ship replicas sail into Mississippi harbor
Replicas of Christopher Columbus' Niña and Pinta have arrived along Mississippi's Gulf Coast, sailing into a Biloxi harbor as spectators aimed their phones out to the horizon. About a dozen spectators lined a pier Wednesday as the ships arrived.
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NewsPlexus Media February 24, 2020

Online daters looking for more than endless swiping
While taboos surrounding online dating are long gone, some of today's app users are sick of the endless swiping and virtual pen-paling that leads nowhere when it comes to long-term relationships, according to industry leaders who are responding with new ways to get users off their phones and out meeting people in the real world.
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NewsPlexus Media February 22, 2020

Hong Kong volunteers make homemade masks to combat virus
Volunteers from a Hong Kong theater group are turning their backstage skills to helping fight the new virus, sewing reusable protective face masks for those who can't access or afford them. Jo Ngai, a drama lover and founder of the group Nonsensemakers, along with her friend Jessie Han have turned a theater rehearsal room into a temporary handmade mask factory.
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NewsPlexus Media February 22, 2020

New colobus monkey makes debut at St. Louis Zoo
The St. Louis Zoo has a new resident, and boy is he cute. The zoo announced Thursday that Teak, a black and white colobus monkey, was born on Feb. 3.
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NewsPlexus Media February 21, 2020

Idaho police say at least two people were killed and three were injured in a shooting at an apartment complex for senior citizens in Caldwell.
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NewsPlexus Media February 21, 2020

Pope tenderly kissed on forehead by man in front-row seat
On Wednesday, Pope Francis seemed to thoroughly enjoy a surprise expression of affection: a long, tender kiss planted on his forehead by a man in one of the front-row seats reserved for ailing or disabled people at the end of his audience.
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NewsPlexus Media February 20, 2020

Bestselling young adult authors are aiming at older readers
Veronica Roth, Tochi Onyebuchi and Sarah J. Maas are among several writers popular with young people who have books out this year intended for older readers. Some have never written for adults, while others move freely among teens and older readers. All are navigating one of the more complicated paths in publishing — how to consciously appeal to different audiences for different books, from the use or absence of profanity to the choice of subject matter and how to present it. The history is mixed: Judy Blume and Neil Gaiman are among those who have succeeded well, while others, including Daniel Handler and Stephanie Meyer, never fully caught on with adults.
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NewsPlexus Media February 19, 2020

In Alaska, rural living complicates access to Real ID
For many Americans, going to a state motor vehicle office can be a tedious time suck. For people who live in rural Alaska's vast patchwork of communities not connected by roads, just getting to a DMV can be a lengthy and pricey ordeal. Motor vehicle offices across the U.S. have experienced high demand as an Oct. 1 deadline approaches for Real IDs, special licenses many will need to board domestic flights and enter some federal facilities. In remote parts of the country, such as rural Alaska, the new ID cards can be harder to get.
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NewsPlexus Media February 19, 2020

Museum's Rembrandt knockoff turns out to be the real thing
Thanks to modern technology and some expert detective work, a nearly 400-year-old painting that had long been attributed to an unknown artist in Rembrandt's workshop has now been judged to have been a work of the Dutch master himself.
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NewsPlexus Media February 18, 2020

San Diego aquarium breeds rare weedy sea dragon in captivity
A Southern California aquarium has successfully bred the rare weedy sea dragon, the lesser known cousin of the sea horse that resembles seaweed when floating.
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NewsPlexus Media February 14, 2020

NASA's space snowman reveals secrets: few craters, no water
NASA's space snowman is revealing fresh secrets from its home far beyond Pluto. More than a year after its close encounter with the snowman-shaped object, the New Horizons spacecraft is still sending back data from more than 4 billion miles away.
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NewsPlexus Media February 12, 2020

Shrinking country: Serbia struggles with population decline
Uros Trainovic remembers when his small mining village in eastern Serbia was a vibrant home to 200 families, had a school of its own, a doctor and a shop. How times have changed. Now, 60-odd years later, it's a ghost village with just eight residents. The transformation of Blagojev Kamen is not unique in a country that experienced years of war and sanctions in the 1990s following the break-up of Yugoslavia.
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NewsPlexus Media February 11, 2020

Massive firework shot over Steamboat Springs, Colorado, breaks world record
A massive firework launched over a Colorado ski resort town has set a record for the world's largest aerial firework. The 2,800-pound shell flew 2,200 feet above the Steamboat Springs Winter Carnival before it burst, turning the sky bright red and drawing gasps from the crowd.
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NewsPlexus Media February 5, 2020

Pennsylvania groundhog declares early spring 'a certainty'
Pennsylvania's most famous groundhog on Sunday declared: "Spring will be early, it's a certainty." At sunrise on Groundhog Day, members of Punxsutawney Phil's top hat-wearing inner circle revealed the cuddly oracle's prediction — his 134th, according to the Pennsylvania Tourism Office.
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NewsPlexus Media January 31, 2020

Berlin zoo's panda twins take their first public tumbles
Pit and Paule, the new star attractions at Berlin's zoo, have made their first foray into the limelight, climbing and tumbling around their cub-proof indoor enclosure to the delight of the cameras.
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NewsPlexus Media January 31, 2020

Telescope reveals details of sun's turbulent surface
A telescope in Hawaii has produced its first images of the sun, revealing its turbulent gas surface in what scientists called unprecedented detail.
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NewsPlexus Media January 31, 2020

Battle of Britain fighter pilot Paul Farnes dies at 101
Paul Farnes, one of the last remaining Battle of Britain fighter pilots who helped protect the U.K. during World War II, has died. He was 101. He had been the last surviving pilot who had been officially designated an "ace" because of the number of enemy aircraft he downed.
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NewsPlexus Media January 30, 2020

Dog and goat vie for honorary mayor of Fair Haven, Vermont
It's Lincoln the goat versus Sammy the dog in the race for honorary mayor of one Vermont town. The Nubian goat had won the post in Fair Haven, Vermont, last year after the town manager came up with the pet mayor election to raise money to rehabilitate a community playground and to get kids civically involved.
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NewsPlexus Media January 29, 2020

Survey: Alaska's Cook Inlet beluga whales continue decline
The population of endangered beluga whales in Alaska's Cook Inlet continues to decline, federal marine mammal authorities announced Tuesday. A biennial survey conducted by the fisheries arm of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration estimated the population of the white whales at 250 to 317, with a median estimate of 279.
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NewsPlexus Media January 28, 2020

Berlin zoo prepares panda cubs for their big day out
Two baby pandas born at Berlin's zoo have been chipped and checked in preparation for their first public outing in a few days, officials said Monday.
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NewsPlexus Media January 26, 2020

For hippo Fiona's 3rd birthday, zoo seeks aid for Australia
The Cincinnati Zoo is using the third birthday of its beloved hippo, born premature, as a way to raise money for Australian wildlife affected by the recent bushfires.
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NewsPlexus Media January 26, 2020

First space-baked cookies took 2 hours in experimental oven
The results are finally in for the first chocolate chip cookie bake-off in space. While looking more or less normal, the best cookies required two hours of baking time last month up at the International Space Station. It takes far less time on Earth, under 20 minutes.
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NewsPlexus Media January 26, 2020

New rules could bump emotional-support animals from planes
The days of passengers bringing their pets on airplanes as emotional-support animals could be ending. The U.S. Department of Transportation on Wednesday proposed that only specially trained dogs qualify as service animals, which must be allowed in the cabin at no charge. Airlines could ban emotional-support animals including untrained dogs, cats and more exotic companions such as pigs, pheasants, rabbits and snakes.
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NewsPlexus Media January 24, 2020

Abused circus animals arrive at South African sanctuary
Twelve tigers and five lions have been relocated to a sanctuary in South Africa after being rescued from circuses in Guatemala following years of abuse and confinement. The animals, both cubs and adults, are among 200 that have been rescued from the circus industry in Guatemala, Peru, Bolivia and Colombia since 2018. The countries have banned the use of animals in circuses.
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NewsPlexus Media January 24, 2020

At 90, Alaska Native woman is 1st counted in US Census
Lizzie Chimiugak has lived for 90 years in the windswept western wilds of Alaska, born to a nomadic family who lived in mud homes and followed where the good hunting and fishing led. Her home now is an outpost on the Bering Sea, Toksook Bay, and on Tuesday she became the first person counted in the U.S. Census, taken every 10 years to apportion representation in Congress and federal money.
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NewsPlexus Media January 20, 2020

Rare coin of Britain's King Edward VIII fetches record $1.3M
One of the world's rarest coins, a gold piece bearing the image of Britain's King Edward VIII before his abdication, has sold for 1 million pounds ($1.3 million), setting a new record for a British coin.
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NewsPlexus Media January 20, 2020

Coming around again: Famous ice disk seems to be re-forming in Westbook, Maine
An ice disk appears to be forming in the same Maine river where an unusually large one formed last winter and quickly gained international fame.
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NewsPlexus Media January 17, 2020

Man who is Indiana's oldest state employee retiring at 102
A 102-year-old man who is Indiana's oldest state employee is retiring after nearly six decades on the job, saying that “your body tells you when it's time to go.” Bob Vollmer plans to report to work for the last time Feb. 6 as a surveyor for the Indiana Department of Natural Resources.
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NewsPlexus Media January 13, 2020

Rare salt formations appear along the Great Salt Lake
Rare salt formations have been documented for the first time on the shores of the Great Salt Lake, and they could yield insights about salt structures found on Mars before they disappear for good. They're showing up now in part because water levels at the largest natural lake west of the Mississippi have been lowered by drought and water diversion, exposing more shoreline. It's a story that's playing out throughout the American West as a growing population puts more demand on scarce water resources.
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NewsPlexus Media January 13, 2020

An Olympic First: Cardboard beds for Tokyo Athletes Village
Tokyo Olympic athletes beware — particularly larger ones. The bed frames in the Athletes Village at this year's Olympics will be made of cardboard. Sturdy cardboard.
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NewsPlexus Media January 12, 2020

Moon river: Rocket part ferried on the mighty Mississippi near New Orleans
With a brass band playing and a parade of workers sporting Mardi Gras beads, a huge component of a new rocket system was wheeled slowly from a New Orleans spacecraft factory on Wednesday to a barge that will float it up the Mississippi River for testing.
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NewsPlexus Media January 12, 2020

Official: DNA test to determine if coyote bit Chicago child
A Chicago animal control official says DNA tests to determine if the coyote captured on the city's North Side is the animal that attacked a 6-year-old boy will take weeks to complete. Jenny Schlueter of the Chicago Animal Care and Control says the coyote that was captured Thursday night will be held at an animal rehabilitation center until the tests are completed.
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NewsPlexus Media January 12, 2020

Statue mocking Donald Trump torched in Slovenia
A wooden statue mocking U.S. President Donald Trump was burned to the ground Thursday in Slovenia, the birthplace of his wife Melania, authorities said. When triggered, a mechanism inside the statue opened a red-painted mouth and shark-like teeth used to appear.
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NewsPlexus Media January 12, 2020

North Americans adjust to Aussie lingo as they fight fires
Australia's place names can be a mouthful to pronounce, and it's one of the challenges that Canadian firefighter John Mash has faced after arriving to help battle the country's deadly wildfires. American firefighter Terrance Gallegos, meanwhile, has been impressed with the scale of the local volunteer effort.
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NewsPlexus Media January 11, 2020

Seeking the cross: Icy dips mark the feast of Epiphany
Thousands of Orthodox Christian worshippers plunged into the icy waters of rivers and lakes across Bulgaria on Monday to retrieve crucifixes tossed by priests in Epiphany ceremonies commemorating the baptism of Jesus Christ. By tradition, the person who retrieves the wooden cross will be freed from evil spirits and will be healthy throughout the year.
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NewsPlexus Media January 11, 2020

Avant-garde posters unveiled as Tokyo Olympics near
The official posters are out for this year's Tokyo Olympics and Paralympics. The 20 posters have been created by 19 artists in fields ranging from painting, graphic design and photography. Calligraphy and Japanese manga are also represented.
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NewsPlexus Media January 5, 2020

Wildfires threaten unique critters on Australian 'Galapagos'
It has been described as Australia's Galapagos Islands and has long been a refuge for some of the country's most endangered creatures. But devastating wildfires over recent days have undone decades of careful conservation work on Kangaroo Island and have threatened to wipe out some of the island's unique fauna altogether.
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NewsPlexus Media January 5, 2020

Berlin police stop removal of urn that angered Jewish groups
Activists said Sunday that Berlin police prevented them from dismantling an art installation that angered Jewish groups after those who erected it claimed it contained Holocaust victims' remains.
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NewsPlexus Media January 5, 2020

Disabled Romanian children given chance to shine
During Romania's communist era, children with disabilities were shunned, often locked away in institutions or kept at home and deprived of schooling and social interactions. Recent shows in which children with Down syndrome had the starring roles illustrate how much that has changed since communism fell in 1989.
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NewsPlexus Media January 5, 2020

New device in New Mexico turns back clock on astronomy
A newly forged steel instrument that can pinpoint the path of stars and planets across the night sky using the naked eye is a throwback to the years just before the advent of telescopes, returning stargazers in the hills of northern New Mexico to the essentials of astronomy in the past. Installed at St. John's College by graduates, the device is a remake of long-lost originals devised by Danish astronomer Tycho Brahe in the late 16th century to chart the location of stars and the orbits of planets.
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NewsPlexus Media January 5, 2020

Fake frogs in school dissections eliminate gross-out-factor
It's a rite of passage in schools across the U.S.: frog dissection. Sometimes it happens in middle school, sometimes in high school. Feelings about the lesson are generally summed up in one word: gross. One Florida high school recently tried to eliminate the gross-out factor by using fake, yet highly realistic, frogs.
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NewsPlexus Media January 3, 2020

Hello, dogo: 2 new breeds get the American Kennel Club's nod
A powerful Argentine big-game hunter and a sociable French water dog have made the American Kennel Club's list of recognized breeds. The club announced Tuesday that the barbet and the dogo Argentino are now part of the 195-breed pack. That means they can compete starting Wednesday in many traditional, breed-judging dog shows (many agility trials and other canine events are open to all dogs, purebred or not).
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NewsPlexus Media January 3, 2020

Kiss them goodbye: Hershey is retiring fleet of Kissmobiles
The Hershey Co. will soon retire its vehicles that are shaped like its Hershey's Kisses. The Hershey Kissmobiles, which are each made up of three massive Kisses candies, have traveled across the country since 1997.
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NewsPlexus Media December 30, 2019

Archives reveal details of alleged informers killed by IRA
Rory Finnis was only 21 when he was killed in 1991 by the Irish Republican Army. Accused of informing the Northern Ireland government of the paramilitary group's activities, the Londonderry man was shot in the head. His hands had been tied behind his back, his eyes taped closed. Details of his death and many others have been revealed in archives newly opened by the Public Records Office of Northern Ireland.
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NewsPlexus Media December 30, 2019

Bali bombers' brother, bomb widow become friends, seek peace
Over the past several years, there has been a growing alliance of former terrorists and victims brought together under the guidance of a group founded by the victim of a terrorist attack. Since 2013, 49 victims and six former extremists have reconciled through the Alliance for a Peaceful Indonesia, or AIDA. They have visited around 150 schools in parts of Indonesia known as hotbeds for extremist recruiters, sharing their stories with more than 8,000 students. The hope is that if former terrorists and victims can learn to see each other as human, they can stop the cycle of vengeance.
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NewsPlexus Media December 29, 2019

Southwest Virginia river the star of new state park
As much of central Appalachia looks to reinvent itself amid the decline of coal, community leaders in southwest Virginia say they are seeing some early success by focusing on another natural resource: the Clinch River. The Clinch, which flows for about 130 miles through four mountainous Virginia counties before crossing into Tennessee, is the centerpiece of what will be one of Virginia’s newest state parks, thanks to a yearslong grassroots effort.
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NewsPlexus Media December 28, 2019

Dancer born with one hand makes Radio City Rockettes history
A dancer born with one hand is the first person with a visible disability ever hired by New York's famed Radio City Rockettes. “I don't want to be known as the dancer who has one hand, and not because that's a bad thing," Sydney Mesher, who joined the Rockettes this season, told Newsday. “But because I've worked very hard to be where I am.”
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NewsPlexus Media December 28, 2019

Slave cemetery poses questions for Florida country club
The rumors swirled for decades: A dark history long lay buried under the grassy knolls and manicured lawns of a country club in Florida's capital city. Over the years, neat rows of rectangular depressions along the 7th fairway deepened in the grass, outlining what would be confirmed this month as sunken graves of the slaves who lived and died on a plantation that once sprawled with cotton near the Florida Capitol. The discovery of 40 graves has spawned discussion about how to honor those who lie in rest at the golf course. And it has brought renewed attention to the many thousands of unmarked and forgotten slave cemeteries across the Deep South that forever could be lost to development or indifference.
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NewsPlexus Media December 28, 2019

Chesapeake Bay oysters get more attention at pivotal time
Robert T. Brown pulled an oyster shell from a pile freshly harvested by a dredger from the Chesapeake Bay and talked enthusiastically about the larvae attached — a sign of a future generation critical to the health of the nation's largest estuary. Not everyone shares Brown's optimistic assessment of the oyster population. The state's first-ever formal stock assessment supported claims by environmentalists that oyster numbers have experienced a sharp decline — down 50% since 1999.
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