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Bringing you opinions and commentary on a variety of topics from around the country. || News Plexus LLC — delivering your news in a convenient, AD-FREE and easy-to-read stream.

Bringing you opinions and commentary on a variety of topics from around the country. || News Plexus LLC — delivering your news in a convenient, AD-FREE and easy-to-read stream.
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NewsPlexus Media August 3, 2020

RUBIN: Trump’s promotion of ‘demon sperm’ doctor bodes ill for any second term
"When the leader of the 'free world' promotes a quack who states that gynecological problems are caused by sex with demons, you know the free world is in big, big trouble," writes Trudy Rubin. "What else can you say when President Donald Trump touts Dr. Stella Immanuel, who claims 'spirit husbands' and 'spirit wives' visit humans in their dreams, and cause fibroids and impotence? Trump retweeted a video in which Immanuel insists that hydroxychloroquine is a 'cure' for COVID-19 and says masks are not needed. Never mind that this dangerous fakery has been repeatedly rebuffed by medical studies and Trump’s own advisers, including Dr. Anthony Fauci; he found the good doctor 'very impressive.'”
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NewsPlexus Media August 3, 2020

GREENHOUSE: Coronavirus is unleashing worker anger and a new wave of unionism
"In recent decades, we have rarely seen so much worker anger and so many strikes as we’ve seen since COVID-19 hit America. Fears of the virus have greatly emboldened American workers," writes Steven Greenhouse. "In California, McDonald’s workers walked out in Los Angeles, San Jose and Oakland to protest a lack of personal protective equipment, while hundreds of farm workers in Washington state went on strike to demand safer conditions and $2 more an hour in hazard pay."
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NewsPlexus Media August 3, 2020

AMBROSE: Who’s responsible for protest violence?
"So now we know. It was a white supremacist who started the first riot in Minneapolis. He was walking along wearing a black coat with an umbrella and, the next thing you knew, he was breaking glass windows with a hammer," writes Jay Ambrose. "The crowd of peaceful protesters got excited and soon enough had mastered the art of destructive mayhem. No less than a day later the protesters had started 30 fires costing $500 million, including in police stations."
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NewsPlexus Media August 1, 2020

GLANTON: When it comes to honoring John Lewis, Donald Trump was no hypocrite
"We should thank Donald Trump for skipping Congressman John Lewis’ farewell ceremony. While his absence from the memorial in the Capitol rotunda on Monday was glaring, Trump did us all a favor by leaving town. To pay respects to a man for whom he showed so little regard in life would be disingenuous," writes Dahleen Glanton. "Trump might be a liar, but at least he is no hypocrite."
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NewsPlexus Media August 1, 2020

O'BRIEN: William Barr only claims to respect the rule of law
"Attorney General William Barr is famously unflappable, the legal technician and savvy Washington insider unswayed by lesser minds or weaker wills. But on Tuesday, during a House Judiciary Committee hearing examining the past 19 months of his tenure, Barr’s legendary composure dissolved several times. His anger flared at moments when his interlocutors didn’t share his unwavering faith in himself," writes Timothy L. O’Brien. "'What I’ve been trying to do is restore the rule of law,' Barr said early in his testimony, offering an animating principle for his leadership of the Justice Department. 'The rule of law is, in essence, that we have one rule for everybody.'”
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NewsPlexus Media August 1, 2020

GOFF: Our brains are conditioned to blame Black people — but we can change that
"When I talk to officers about a police shooting, they usually ask some version of the same question: “So, what did they do?” The second half of the question — to deserve it — is assumed," writes Phillip Atiba Goff. "Running the Center for Policing Equity means I work with departments that want to reduce bias and violence. Yet the assumption that victims, particularly Black victims, must have deserved their fate is deeply ingrained. Even reform-minded officers start by fitting each shooting into a story they think they’ve seen before: resistant suspect shot by threatened officer."
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NewsPlexus Media July 31, 2020

HILTZIK: Why can’t social media hold back torrent of right-wing conspiracies?
"By conventional standards, Twitter, Facebook and YouTube showed themselves to be paragons of public service Monday when they took down a video promoting a long-debunked 'cure for COVID' and agitating against mask-wearing," writes Michael Hiltzik. "The conservative broadcast chain Sinclair also has been praised in some quarters for canceling a segment on one of its television shows promoting an especially unhinged assertion that Dr. Anthony Fauci played a role in manufacturing coronaviruses and sending them to China. By real-world standards, however, the social media giants and Sinclair failed miserably."
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NewsPlexus Media July 31, 2020

MACARIO: How COVID-19 has added to the problem of drug-resistant antibiotics
"As the world grapples with COVID-19, another pandemic has gone mostly unnoticed. Each year, 700,000 people — including as many as 160,000 Americans — lose their lives to antibiotic-resistant bacteria," writes Everly Macario. "Jump-starting research into these medicines — whether through government grants or private initiatives — needs to be a national priority. Without such efforts, millions of families will suffer the horrible loss ours did. Antimicrobial resistance, or AMR, the phenomenon by which bacteria and fungi evolve and become immune to drugs, could kill 10 million people annually by 2050."
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NewsPlexus Media July 31, 2020

FARREN & MOZENA: A different fiscal fix for state, local governments
"State and local government leaders across America anxiously await the results of Congress’ debate over the next round of federal coronavirus relief. A $1 trillion bailout to close budget gaps brought on by the pandemic is on the line. But it’s not the only solution," write Michael Farren and John Mozena. "Bipartisan reformers in the states have already been making headway on ending wasteful (and sometimes crooked) economic development subsidies — and Congress could help accomplish that same goal."
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NewsPlexus Media July 30, 2020

TORNOE: Can we please stop spitting on grocery store workers?
"Just a few months ago, Americans rightly lauded grocery store employers as heroes — underpaid front line workers who braved the ravages of the coronavirus pandemic so households could put food on the table," writes Rob Tornoe. "These days, not so much."
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NewsPlexus Media July 30, 2020

GLANTON: Today’s social justice movement was born out of anger, not hope
"Fighting for social justice has never been pretty. People get impatient and angry. Someone always gets knocked down," writes Dahleen Glanton. "John Lewis’ beating on Bloody Sunday revealed how treacherous it was to challenge the status quo more than a half-century ago. Eighteen-year-old Miracle Boyd, who got her teeth knocked out by police during a protest in Chicago’s Grant Park a week ago, reminded us how dangerous fighting for change still is."
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NewsPlexus Media July 30, 2020

"The news that Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg is being treated for a recurrence of cancer is striking terror in the hearts of liberals. As long as she is physically able, the resolute, gutsy Ginsburg will stay on the Supreme Court until there is a Democratic president and a Democratic majority in the Senate," writes Noah Feldman. "But what if, in the worst-case scenario, Ginsburg’s health forces her out before President Donald Trump’s term in office is over? Worried liberals have been asking me if there’s anything Senate Democrats can do to prevent Trump from getting a third Supreme Court pick in his four years in office. I can’t give them a very comforting answer."
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NewsPlexus Media July 29, 2020

MCNAMARA: AOC’s tear-down of Tom Yoho is the best TV I’ve seen in years
"Oh, it’s a rare and beautiful day when the best, most rousing, pointed and important speech is brought to you by C-SPAN," writes Mary McNamara. "Remember when 'The West Wing’s' President Bartlet launched a line-by-line tear-down of Leviticus after some conservative talk show host referred to homosexuality as an 'abomination' because that’s what it was called in the Bible? Of course you do. And now you’ll remember the day Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y., speaking from the House floor, systematically dismembered Rep. Ted Yoho, R-Fla., for thinking it’s OK to publicly call a woman a 'f — bitch' if she’s doing something you do not want her to do."
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NewsPlexus Media July 29, 2020

CRISP: Are we prepared for a Civil War Lite?
"If President Donald Trump loses the election on Nov. 3, what are our chances of a peaceful, dignified transfer of power of the sort that has generally characterized our republic from its beginning? Let’s face it: The country is not in a good mood," writes John M. Crisp. "And a country this cranky is going to be hard pressed to put aside its partisanship long enough to perform the essential democratic ritual, the willing concession of power by one party to another following a national election."
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NewsPlexus Media July 29, 2020

SMITH: They’re fed up with face masks. But Portland? That’s about law and order
"If there’s one thing I had hoped most Californians could agree on, it’s that federal agents snatching American citizens off the streets, throwing them into unmarked vehicles, taking them to undisclosed locations for interrogation and then releasing them without an explanation is a bad thing," writes Erika D. Smith. "In particular, I thought that maybe — just maybe — the most conservative of Republicans, who are constantly on guard for some unwelcome overreach by government, would be like-minded about this. But no. That’s not where we are in 2020."
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NewsPlexus Media July 24, 2020

MCFEATTERS: What are the 15 signs of authoritarianism? We’ve seen them
You probably are asking yourself, about now, “What are 15 signs my country is sliding into authoritarianism?” Here they are.
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NewsPlexus Media July 24, 2020

MARTELLE: Did Trump ask an ambassador to steer business to one of his resorts?
"It can be hard to remember here in the grasp of the coronavirus pandemic, and amid President Donald Trump’s persistent displays of arrogant incompetence, that this whole Trump Era is at heart one massive grift," writes Scott Martelle. "The most recent entry: a report that Trump financial backer and current ambassador to Great Britain, Robert Wood Johnson IV, made inquiries at Trump’s request into whether the British government could help grease the skids for Trump Turnberry golf resort in Scotland to host an upcoming British Open Championship — one of four so-called 'majors' in professional golf."
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NewsPlexus Media July 24, 2020

NOCERA: COVID-19 has the power to break the sports world
“'Sports,' Washington Nationals pitcher Sean Doolittle said recently, 'are like the reward for a functioning society.' Does it therefore hold that in a nation so dysfunctional it can’t deal with a deadly pandemic, sports will be crippled? The U.S. is about to find out and discover what that means not just for the players, coaches and television executives but for all of us," writes Joe Nocera.
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NewsPlexus Media July 23, 2020

LEUBSDORF: The best tribute to John Lewis
"The last few days have been filled with well-deserved tributes to John Lewis, the last of the great Southern Black leaders who played major roles in leading the civil rights revolution of the 1960s that demolished most legal barriers to equality for all Americans. In due course, the late Georgia congressman and civil rights icon will be honored by having his name placed on schools and other buildings, perhaps even the National Museum of African American History and Culture, whose construction he was instrumental in achieving," writes Carl P. Leubsdorf. "But members of Congress can create a more immediate memorial to Lewis by enacting the House-passed legislation to restore the key provision that the Supreme Court removed from the 1965 Voting Rights Act seven years ago."
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NewsPlexus Media July 23, 2020

RUBIN: Trump administration rejects human rights principles at home and abroad
"Last week, Mike Pompeo came to the National Constitution Center in Philadelphia to release a yearlong State Department study on the U.S. approach to human rights," writes Trudy Rubin. "You might think the secretary of state’s timing strange, as President Donald Trump mocks basic human rights principles at home and abroad. But Pompeo told his audience, 'The timing couldn’t be better.' I agree."
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NewsPlexus Media July 23, 2020

JORDAN & WILLIAMS: Surprise, surprise. Big bank racism is corrupting PPP loans
"In recent weeks, American banks have denounced systemic racism and pledged support to Black lives. Yet their practices during this pandemic and their role in distributing money from the $660 billion Paycheck Protection Program show how systemic racism is embedded in their business model," write Emma Coleman Jordan and Jamillah Bowman Williams. "Last week, the Trump administration finally disclosed the names of many companies that received forgivable loans from the program, which is intended to keep small businesses afloat. Yet included among the recipients were big investment firms, big name law firms and companies connected to prominent political insiders."
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NewsPlexus Media July 22, 2020

COMMENTARY: The pandemic may very well last another year or more
"Anthony Fauci has recently taken some heat in Washington for supposedly being too pessimistic about how long it will take to bring the COVID-19 pandemic under control. In fact, the head of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases is probably being too optimistic, a new survey of leading health care company leaders and investors suggests," write Peter R. Orszag, David Gluckman and Stephen H. Sands. "In congressional testimony and news interviews, Fauci has said an effective and safe vaccine may be available by the end of 2020 or early 2021. Yet almost three in four health care executives and investors believe an effective and safe vaccine will not be widely available until the second half of 2021 or even later."
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NewsPlexus Media July 22, 2020

ALI: Trump’s failures leave conservative media figures, acolytes exposed
"Tucker Carlson took a sudden 'long-planned' vacation. New York Times columnist Bari Weiss resigned. Rush Limbaugh floated cannibalism as a pioneer coping mechanism to learn from," writes Lorraine Ali. "The COVID-19 pandemic has us all rattled, but the cultural equivalent of an 8.5 on the Richter scale shook conservative media last week when center-right columnists and hard-line radio and TV personalities alike lost their footing, their will or, in Limbaugh’s case, their minds while trying to defend their views."
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NewsPlexus Media July 22, 2020

GABOR: Opening campuses is risky. The alternative is worse
"Soaring coronavirus infections have provoked a lot of second thoughts among U.S. colleges and universities that were hoping to resume at least some in-person instruction in the fall. That’s understandable, but troubling," writes Andrea Gabor. "It’s crucial to engage students in meaningful collaborative experiences that are difficult to achieve on Zoom. The damage to young people and institutions of higher learning will be deep and lasting unless administrators develop creative ways — in concert with both students and faculty — to revive key aspects of campus life."
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NewsPlexus Media July 21, 2020

MCGOUGH: Supreme Court — again — shamefully makes it hard for Americans to vote
"On Thursday the Supreme Court, responding to an emergency appeal, issued an order that will make it impossible for thousands of former prison inmates convicted of felonies to vote in Florida’s primary election," writes Michael McGough. "It’s an ominous ruling in an election year already thrown into confusion by the COVID-19 pandemic and haunted by the specter of partisan disputes about voter fraud and voter suppression."
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NewsPlexus Media July 21, 2020

MARTELLE: Trump's federal agents spirit away protesters. What country is this?
"Taking a page from the playbooks of autocrats around the globe, President Donald Trump has deployed federal agents to patrol the streets of Portland, Oregon, where, dressed in camouflage uniforms that identified them only as 'police,' they have reportedly used tear gas to dispel protesters — and more darkly, cruised the city in unmarked vans in search of suspected protesters before spiriting them off," writes Scott Martelle. "Protester Donavan La Bella, exercising his fundamental right to free speech recently by standing across the street from a federal courthouse and holding up a loudspeaker, was hit in the head with a 'less than lethal' projectile, fracturing his skull and sending him into surgery."
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NewsPlexus Media July 21, 2020

DEGRAZIA: Maybe you have a right to put health at risk, but not that of others
“'I don’t need a mask!' declared the San Diego woman to a Starbucks barista. The woman apparently believed she had a right to enter mask-free, contrary to the coffee bar’s policy," writes David DeGrazia. "A surprising number of Americans treat expectations of mask-wearing during the coronavirus pandemic in a similar way — as if these expectations were paternalistic, limiting people’s liberty for their own good. They are dead wrong."
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NewsPlexus Media July 20, 2020

DAALDER: Trump’s epic fail: His gambit with Iran drives Tehran toward China
"In May 2018, President Donald Trump announced his decision to withdraw from the Iran nuclear deal because it was “defective at its core.” But if Tehran were willing to negotiate a better agreement, he would be 'ready, willing and able' to join them," writes Ivo Daalder. "Last week, Iran announced that it was ready for a new deal. Unfortunately, that deal would be with China, rather than the United States. And instead of curtailing Iran’s nuclear capabilities, the new agreement would establish a far-reaching economic and security partnership between the two nations."
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NewsPlexus Media July 20, 2020

LITMAN: Roger Stone has more to answer for. Congress could make him talk
"President Donald Trump’s commutation of Roger Stone’s sentence is a body blow to two core democratic values. The first, and most immediate, is the principle of fair and impartial justice for all. It is a travesty that Stone — who was plainly guilty of serious crimes, who snubbed his nose repeatedly at the justice system, who continues to challenge his convictions — is now a free man. There is little that can be done now to reverse that injustice," writes Harry Litman. "The second principle is the public’s right to know, in this case about the full story of the 2016 election and the Trump campaign’s complicity in Russia’s attack on American institutions. Here Stone may yet be called to account, and that should be a goal shared across political boundaries."
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NewsPlexus Media July 20, 2020

MCGOUGH: Sessions did the right thing in Russia probe; it cost him his career
"Jeff Sessions, the former U.S. senator from Alabama who served as President Donald Trump’s first attorney general and punching bag, lost the Republican runoff primary for his old Senate seat this week," writes Michael McGough. "It would be comforting to think that voters rejected him because of his reactionary views on crime and immigration, but it’s far likelier that he was denied a comeback because he decided to recuse himself from supervising the investigation into possible ties between Russia and the 2016 Trump campaign."
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NewsPlexus Media July 17, 2020

COMMENTARY: How to fight Russia’s trolling of Americans during the 2020 campaign
"Another presidential election is approaching, which means Russian election interference is back in the news. Maybe you’ve already made up your mind about your favorite candidate, and so you’re immune to the social media messaging being circulated by Russian trolls — right? Not exactly," write Marek N. Posard, James Marrone and Todd Helmus. "Russian trolls aren’t only targeting behaviors, like pulling a voting lever. They’re targeting beliefs, trying to stoke tribalism and polarization. Those who think they are immune to Russian tactics could become complacent, and feed right into Russian hands."
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NewsPlexus Media July 17, 2020

COMMENTARY: Bias against African American English is a pillar of systemic racism
"In the national conversation taking place about systemic racism in the United States, one important element should not be overlooked: linguistic prejudice," write Sharese King and Katherine D. Kinzler. "African American English, like other dialects used in the U.S., is a legitimate form of speech with a deep history and culture. Yet centuries of bias against speakers of AAE continue to have profound effects on employment, education, the criminal system and social mobility. To attack systemic racism, we have to confront this prejudice."
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NewsPlexus Media July 17, 2020

DRONEY: The Roger Stone commutation is a step into dangerous territory
"When President Donald Trump commuted Roger Stone’s sentence of 40 months in prison for lying to Congress and tampering with a witness, he crossed into new territory dangerous to the republic," writes Christopher F. Droney. "Trump terminated Stone’s sentence through the exercise of the pardon power provided to the president by our Constitution. Although Trump has previously exercised this power contrary to its purposes, rewarding a campaign official for illegal acts benefiting the president in his campaign for the presidency is the final straw. Our only choice is to amend the Constitution and restrict the use of this power to its original purposes."
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NewsPlexus Media July 16, 2020

RUBIN: White House could be turning Voice of America into Trump radio network
"In the newest White House nod to neo-authoritarianism, President Donald Trump seems bent on remaking Voice of America into Voice of Trump," writes Trudy Rubin. "This U.S.-funded network was set up in Washington, D.C., in 1942 to broadcast news of America overseas. It was never intended to be a partisan propaganda tool, like state-run Russian or Chinese overseas networks. Nor was it meant to be the voice of one political party."
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NewsPlexus Media July 16, 2020

LEUBSDORF: Trump puts politics before nation’s interest in push to open schools
"In demanding that schools reopen full bore and on time, President Donald Trump is once again putting his own political interest ahead of the country’s interest," writes Carl P. Leubsdorf. "Fortunately, many school districts from Los Angeles to New York aren’t buying, opting to start the school year late or with a hybrid combination of in-class and remote learning designed to protect the health of not only students but teachers, custodians and bus drivers."
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NewsPlexus Media July 16, 2020

MCGOUGH: Pelosi is half-right: Voters must punish Trump for sparing Roger Stone
"It’s understandable that Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi is outraged by President Donald Trump’s decision to commute the sentence of his pal Roger Stone. Last year, a jury convicted the self-described dirty trickster of seven felony counts, including witness tampering and lying to Congress, and he was sentenced to three years and four months in prison," writes Michael McGough. "But Pelosi is probably blowing constitutional smoke by proposing that Congress pass legislation 'to ensure that no president can pardon or commute the sentence of an individual who is engaged in a coverup campaign to shield that president from criminal prosecution.'”
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NewsPlexus Media July 15, 2020

LITTLE: There’s no excuse for how much food you’re wasting
“'Dump potatoes in the rivers … Slaughter the pigs and bury them, and let the putrescence drip down into the earth,' John Steinbeck wrote in “The Grapes of Wrath.” 'There is a failure here that topples all our success.' Steinbeck’s lament against food waste is eerily relevant today, as supply-chain disruptions from the coronavirus pandemic have continued to force farmers to euthanize hogs they can’t sell and bury excess potatoes," writes Amanda Little.
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NewsPlexus Media July 15, 2020

ISHISAKA: Envision a criminal legal system that doesn’t throw people away
"Usually the first response I get when talking about radically re-envisioning our criminal legal system away from mass incarceration is: 'But what are we going to do about the violent criminals who are a danger to us?' Putting aside the fact that only a slice of incarcerated people are in jails and prisons due to violent crime, the argument assumes that there is a separate category of 'us' and 'them,' and that you can somehow lock away the 'problem' people and not have it create a destructive ripple effect for the individual, their families and all of our communities," write Naomi Ishisaka. "Our existing system of criminalization and mass incarceration is not working, by any measure."
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NewsPlexus Media July 15, 2020

FELDMAN: The Supreme Court is still capable of shocking the nation
"The U.S. Supreme Court term that ended last week was a blockbuster, with landmark decisions on abortion, LGBTQ rights, presidential power, immigration, religious liberty and American Indian law. No term in almost two decades comes close to having issued so many crucial decisions — with long-term consequences for millions of Americans," writes Noah Feldman. "The drama of the term was enhanced by what you might think of as coming-out events for two justices: chosen transformations that change the way each presents to the world."
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NewsPlexus Media July 14, 2020

ERVIN: Why those statues should come tumbling down
"It’s a standard part of every revolution: The gleeful citizens amass in the square and topple the towering statue of the dethroned despot. And then they dance for joy," writes Mike Ervin. "It never works the other way around. The citizens never get together and solemnly erect a statue of the despot to serve as a reminder of a dark and brutal time so that future generations will never forget what happened. No, the only way you’ll ever see a scene like that is if you take a video of a toppling ceremony and run it backward."
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NewsPlexus Media July 14, 2020

MCGOUGH: Judge who oversaw Flynn’s case is fighting to rehear it. Good for him
"U.S. District Court Judge Emmet G. Sullivan, who had the case of former national security adviser Michael Flynn yanked out of his hands by a federal appeals court panel, is not through fighting. On Thursday, Sullivan’s lawyers asked the full U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia to rehear the case and reconsider the ruling of the three-judge panel," writes Michael McGough. "(On Friday the court stayed the panel’s order pending consideration of Sullivan’s petition.) It’s vital that the full appeals court accede to Sullivan’s request, even if the ultimate result is that Sullivan accepts a motion by the Justice Department that he dismiss the charge that Flynn lied to the FBI about his conversations with Russia’s ambassador during the presidential transition."
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NewsPlexus Media July 14, 2020

HEALEY: What a world it would be if Facebook stopped running political ads
"Facebook may finally stop lending its enormously powerful microphone and amplifier to deceitful politicians and manipulative campaigns. And in doing so, it would also block truthful candidates who are just trying to correct the record, outline their policies or encourage people to get out and vote," writes Jon Healey. "It’s a fair trade as far as I’m concerned."
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NewsPlexus Media July 13, 2020

ZURAWIK: Lincoln Project taking no prisoners in media campaign to defeat Trump
"At the Democratic National Convention in 2016, First Lady Michelle Obama famously compared her party’s campaign practices to those of Donald Trump’s Republicans by saying, 'When they go low, we go high.' As admirable as that strategy is, it proved a loser in the November general election to the down and dirty words and tactics of Trump, the king of transgression," writes David Zurawik. "The Lincoln Project, a political action committee led by veteran Republican politicos and campaign media strategists opposed to Trump, isn’t about to let that happen in 2020 as they seek to deny the president another four years. 'When Trump goes low, the Lincoln Project kicks him in the groin,' said Kurt Bardella, a senior adviser to the project."
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NewsPlexus Media July 13, 2020

STOLZENBERG: Idea of religious freedom is being used to undermine other rights
“'Religious discrimination. It’s an accusation we hear with increasing frequency. Indeed, discrimination on the basis of religion is one of the few common concerns our divided society has left. But even here, political polarization has left its mark," writes Nomi Stolzenberg. "As conservatives use it, 'religious discrimination' carries a meaning that is largely lost on the broader public. Now, with three new decisions from the Supreme Court, we can see how that conservative conception of religious discrimination intrudes on some of the most basic principles of the American democratic tradition."
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NewsPlexus Media July 13, 2020

ABDUL-JABBAR: How to sustain momentum for the anti-racism movement
“'I hear America singing, the varied carols I hear.' My old UCLA coach, John Wooden, used to quote that Walt Whitman poem often, and I’ve been hearing its echoes on the streets lately. The people out protesting systemic racism and vowing change are “singing with open mouths their strong melodious songs” about the America that could be — that should be," writes Kareem Abdul-Jabbar. "But in my 60 years of social activism, I’ve heard these gospel songs before and my fear is that once the spotlights go down, the sympathetic audience — now moved to tears by the chorus — simply goes home, the words to the songs quickly forgotten."
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NewsPlexus Media July 12, 2020

SUNSTEIN: Deporting foreign college students would be really dumb
"Does President Donald Trump want to deport everyone who is not an American citizen? Sometimes it seems that way. His administration recently announced that it may send home international students at colleges and universities that choose online learning in the fall, in an effort to reduce the risks associated with the coronavirus pandemic," writes Cass R. Sunstein. "The announcement is cruel. It’s also stupid."
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NewsPlexus Media July 12, 2020

"For weeks, the closest thing to drama on the Democratic side of the presidential campaign has been the Veepstakes: the mysterious process by which Joe Biden is choosing his candidate for vice president," writes Doyle McManus. "Political junkies, including me, are watching the Veepstakes mostly because it’s the only entertainment the Biden Channel offers. But most Americans are not on the edges of their seats, and that’s understandable."
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NewsPlexus Media July 12, 2020

MCFEATTERS: What will Trump run on?
"When Donald Trump was asked on Fox News about his priorities for a second term, he was unusually tongue-tied," writes Ann McFeatters. That's because he doesn't have many wins.
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NewsPlexus Media July 11, 2020

BERNSTEIN: Trump is acting as if he wants to lose
"President Donald Trump began a week in which the coronavirus pandemic continues to spread, with devastating consequences for public health and for the economy, by bashing NASCAR for banning Confederate symbols and Black NASCAR driver Bubba Wallace for not apologizing for … well, it wasn’t exactly clear what he thought Wallace should apologize for. At any rate, it put Trump squarely on the other side of the issue from NASCAR, and from (for example) most White state legislators in Mississippi, who recently voted to remove Confederate symbolism from their state flag," writes Jonathan Bernstein. "My immediate reaction over on Twitter was to question whether Trump would be behaving any differently if he had given up on winning reelection and was instead trying to cultivate a fanatical group of loyal customers for future business endeavors."
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NewsPlexus Media July 11, 2020

CRUMP & WHITE: Lawyers can’t visit clients, so quit monitoring their emails
"As concern over the impact of COVID-19 on prison populations began to mount, the federal Bureau of Prisons implemented a ban in March that prohibits lawyers from visiting their incarcerated clients. However justifiable the ban may be, it compounds the challenges lawyers face representing those held in custody, a crucial tool lawyers rely on to gather the facts they need to mount an effective defense," write Catherine Crump and Ken White. "While nothing can replace the way face-to-face interactions help build trust, the bureau should at long last end its unjust policy of requiring inmates to 'voluntarily' waive privilege in emails they send to their attorneys through the bureau-provided email system."
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