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Bringing you opinions and commentary on a variety of topics from around the country. || News Plexus LLC — delivering your news in a convenient, AD-FREE and easy-to-read stream.

Bringing you opinions and commentary on a variety of topics from around the country. || News Plexus LLC — delivering your news in a convenient, AD-FREE and easy-to-read stream.
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NewsPlexus Media March 27, 2020

HILTZIK: Has Trump even read his own ‘Coronavirus Guidelines for America’?
"Like millions of other shut-in Americans, I received in the mail Tuesday a postcard-sized advisory on coronavirus practices purporting to come straight from the White House. Labeled 'President Trump’s Coronavirus Guidelines for America,' the postcard offers responsible advice," writes Michael Hiltzik. "What’s remarkable about the advisory, of course, is that contradicts what appears to be the developing Trump administration policy aimed at cutting the nation’s social distancing practices by Easter, or April 12."
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NewsPlexus Media March 27, 2020

NEWKIRK: Think your lockdown is unpleasant? Imagine how your dog feels every day
"People around the world are bemoaning having to stay mostly at home for some weeks because of COVID-19. After just a day or two — even with the internet, Netflix, books, music, games, FaceTime and endless other ways to entertain themselves and stay connected, not to mention walks in the park and trips to the grocery store — many people reported feeling lonely, bored, restless, or even depressed or angry," writes Ingrid Newkirk. "Perhaps this will help them empathize with their dogs."
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NewsPlexus Media March 27, 2020

PAHNKE: Invest in farmers for the future
"The COVID-19 pandemic has shuttered many restaurants, factories and stores, causing the U.S. economy to grind to a halt. As Congress works to deliver a massive stimulus package, let’s not forget rural America and the American farmer," writes Anthony Pahnke. "This is our opportunity to bring about a rural renaissance, characterized by fair incomes, competitive markets and a new generation of farmers. In fact, the reinvigoration of small-scale American farming is one of the primary ways that we can guard against future pandemics."
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NewsPlexus Media March 26, 2020

BUNCH: Will a coronavirus mirage of clean air, water inspire climate action?
"No one is really celebrating such a sudden drop in pollution on the eve of the 50th anniversary of the first Earth Day — not when the cause is a global pandemic that has already taken the lives of more than 500 Americans and at least 17,000 worldwide, with efforts to stem the coronavirus bring about an economic shutdown that may already be causing the biggest disruption since the Great Depression," writes Will Bunch. "But on the front lines where scientists and activists have been fighting another planetary threat now abruptly pushed to a back burner — climate change — both the stunning images of blue skies, and gigantic scope of the political and societal interventions to stop coronavirus, raise some inevitable questions. Another world looks possible — but is it all a grand and temporary illusion, to be blurred by a return to normalcy once the all-clear whistle sounds?"
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NewsPlexus Media March 26, 2020

RODRICKS: New viruses, short memories and the need for constant vigilance
"Every 25 to 30 years, the eminent virologist Robert Gallo has said, a gap occurs in the study of viruses, and the results are devastating. It’s one of the reasons why Gallo, director of the Institute of Human Virology in Baltimore, established the Global Virus Network, a collaboration of disease experts in 32 countries who share information and watch for trouble," writes Dan Rodricks. "It’s also why Gallo is still on the job. He turned 83 on Monday, with no apparent plans for retirement. He worries. He worries that medical science is not attracting enough young, brilliant virologists. He worries most of all about gaps in human memory, about politicians and scientists forgetting what happens when there’s a lapse in vigilance."
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NewsPlexus Media March 26, 2020

JONES: Expelling foreign journalists is a bad idea for both China and the US
"China’s announcement on March 17 that it will expel at least 13 American journalists with the New York Times, Washington Post and Wall Street Journal will hurt China more than it will punish the United States. But it’s not good for anyone," writes Terril Yue Jones. "The move is obviously bad for U.S. news consumers, who rely on these outlets for accurate reporting. But it also is bad for China. At a time when China is having some success combating the COVID-19 pandemic, the world needs to get news of that from trusted sources. Ultimately, the expulsion order could cast doubt on Beijing’s message that it has brought the coronavirus crisis under control."
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NewsPlexus Media March 25, 2020

"The census is a constitutionally mandated process that has occurred since 1790. It has been administered during a world war, earthquakes, the Great Depression — and now a pandemic," write Christian Arana and Jacqueline Martinez Garcel. "The coronavirus presents a particular challenge to the 2020 census — which kicked off earlier this month — because human transmission of the virus has prompted public health officials to discourage public gatherings and limit social interactions. Most of us are self-isolating at home."
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NewsPlexus Media March 25, 2020

WESTNEAT: The coronavirus exposes the fraud of the anti-government movement
"When Republicans met last week in Congress to talk about showering the nation with a record $1 trillion-plus economic stimulus plan, their concern wasn’t so much whether that was fiscally wise. They were worried how to brand it," writes Danny Westneat. "... How about 'freedom payments?' a senator suggested. This was presumably a joke (though with this gang you never know). But I hope it sticks, because the name 'freedom payments' perfectly captures the fraud at the heart of the decadeslong anti-government movement."
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NewsPlexus Media March 25, 2020

GALBRAITH: We need food, medicine and safety, not tax cuts, to face coronavirus
"As the COVID-19 crisis deepens, my fellow economists have reached deep into their bare cupboards of old ideas, and what have they found? Models that do not work: bailouts for big companies. Tax cuts for people well-off enough to owe taxes. Cash-grant schemes, a favorite of the universal income crowd," writes James K. Galbraith. "These tactics won’t be effective. We cannot predict how bad the economic situation will get. And however bad it is, you cannot fill the hole with money alone."
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NewsPlexus Media March 24, 2020

MCMANUS: Trump’s strange coronavirus show
"President Donald Trump is finally taking the coronavirus contagion seriously. Only a week ago, Trump told Americans the pandemic was nothing to worry about. 'Relax,'” he said. 'We’re doing great,'” writes Doyle McManus. "But after casualty projections soared and financial markets plummeted, he appeared to realize that the crisis will define his presidency and determine whether he wins a second term."
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NewsPlexus Media March 24, 2020

REED: Shortage of easily made products needed to fight virus is indefensible
"In 1939, two years before the Japanese bombing of Pearl Harbor drew the United States into World War II, the U.S. military was an anemic force in which Army troops still used horses to pull around artillery. Then an emergency buildup ordered by President Franklin D. Roosevelt transformed U.S. automakers’ manufacturing plants into extraordinarily efficient producers of tanks, guns, airplane engines and more," writes Chris Reed. "Given this history, any assertion by federal, state and local officials that America is crippled in its coronavirus response because of a lack of coronavirus tests, hand sanitizers, sanitary masks, hospital respirators, respirator valves and ventilators seems simply bizarre. Generally speaking, these are not complicated products to make."
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NewsPlexus Media March 24, 2020

HEALEY: Sens. Burr and Loeffler cashing in on coronavirus?
"How bad does a Republican senator have to screw up to draw an on-air condemnation from Fox News’ Tucker Carlson? Evidently, he has to appear both self-serving and hypocritical," writes Jon Healey. "The target of Carlson’s ire is Sen. Richard Burr (R-N.C.), the subject of twin exposes by ProPublica and NPR. The pieces showed how Burr painted a far more negative picture of the coronavirus’ impacts in private than he did in public, and how he spared his nest egg from the carnage on Wall Street with some well-timed stock sales."
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NewsPlexus Media March 21, 2020

BARRECA: Even in a coronavirus crisis, laughter is the best medicine
“'Laughing together is as close as you can get without touching,' I wrote in my first book, 'They Used To Call Me Snow White … But I Drifted: Women’s Strategic Use of Humor,' published in 1991," writes Gina Barreca. "Laughter has always been the best medicine; I wasn’t exactly making any boldly original statement almost three decades ago. I wasn’t expecting a MacArthur grant. But what I expected even less than a MacArthur grant was that the not-touching part of my line would eventually be part of a stentorian, global prescription to combat COVID-19."
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NewsPlexus Media March 21, 2020

BLOOMBERG: The economic response we need to the coronavirus
"Never before has a public-health emergency created such widespread economic paralysis. As government officials work to slow the spread of the coronavirus, treat the afflicted, and save lives, it is essential that Congress and the president take immediate actions to stabilize a dangerously teetering economy and lay the groundwork for long-term recovery," writes Michael R. Bloomberg.
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NewsPlexus Media March 21, 2020

SMITH: How to limit hoarding and keep America’s hands clean
“'What happened to the soap?'” That’s what many Americans may be thinking as they wander forlornly through the aisles of local grocery stores (always careful, of course, to maintain a 6-foot distance from other customers). Fresh food may be abundant, but the necessities of a disease quarantine — hand soap, sanitizer, toilet paper and so on — are increasingly hard to find," writes Noah Smith. "For some items, such as peanut butter, this isn’t much of a problem. But for soap, hoarding could set back the country’s ability to suppress the coronavirus by making it harder for people to clean their hands — which medical professionals say is important to prevent the disease from spreading. As it happens, economists have been thinking about the problem of hoarding for a while."
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NewsPlexus Media March 20, 2020

LEUBSDORF: Trump has his crisis moment as president
"It happens in every presidency, the unexpected, unforeseen crisis. It not only supersedes the administration’s preplanned priorities, but it plays a significant role in determining its political fate and historical standing," writes Carl P. Leubsdorf. "Despite his personal shortcomings, Donald Trump has glided through three years without a major crisis, buoyed by the growing economy he inherited and the tax cut that kept it going. But in the past month, the onset of the deadly coronavirus has exposed his lack of focus, preparedness and adeptness to cope with the unexpected."
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NewsPlexus Media March 20, 2020

NAVARRO: We need health care for all — even the undocumented
"The global coronavirus pandemic has come roaring into the United States. With thousands of confirmed cases and more than 100 deaths, the entire country is in a state of emergency as Americans grapple with the new realities of 'social distancing,'" writes Josue De Luna Navarro. "The point of all this is to limit the spread of the disease. But just avoiding each other isn’t enough — we also need to make sure anyone who needs care gets it as quickly as possible. If we can learn one thing from the pandemic, it’s that the United States must provide high-quality health care for all. And I mean all of us — including undocumented immigrants."
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NewsPlexus Media March 20, 2020

MANZELLA: Coronavirus gives Trump an opportunity to correct missteps on China
"President Donald Trump’s intention to persuade China to play by long-established international trade rules is commendable. But focusing on the U.S. trade deficit with China, and imposing tariffs to eliminate it, has proven ineffective," writes John Manzella. "Now, the coronavirus has given Trump an opportunity to shelve that failed strategy and immediately eliminate tariffs on Chinese imports. This shot in the arm will likely be reciprocated by China, stimulate our economies, and give Trump the opportunity to chart a better course. Let me explain."
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NewsPlexus Media March 18, 2020

COMMENTARY: Doctors’ advice: What we can do now to slow the coronavirus
"As communities across the United States and around the world put drastic measures in place to control the coronavirus pandemic, many questions have arisen about what else we can do — individually, by our public officials and within the medical community — to keep ourselves safe," write Robert A. Weinstein and Cory Franklin. "As physicians, one who specializes in infectious diseases, we offer basic guidance."
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NewsPlexus Media March 18, 2020

LANGER: Bringing decency to the race for the president
"It’s a beautiful thing when quiet, ordinary people rise up and say “enough.” That’s what’s been happening in the Democratic Party as suburban moms, African Americans, voters with college degrees and older voters flock to the one candidate that’s cornered the market on nice," writes Nancy Anne Langer. "Just when everyone thought this election would turn on the economy, or on Trumpism, or on the 1%, or on who captivated the young’uns, it’s gone goody two-shoes. It’s the decency election, stupid."
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NewsPlexus Media March 18, 2020

MURRAY: Coronavirus stressing you out? Here’s how to cope
"Considerable attention today is rightly focused on the clinical course of a coronavirus infection and how it can vary from the mild to the severe. The pandemic is having something of a parallel impact on mental health: some are taking it in stride, while for others the stress is significant. Most of us will be somewhere in the middle," writes Laura K. Murray. "Here are a few suggestions for managing COVID-19 risks to our mental health that can be adopted alongside efforts like social distancing to manage disease transmission."
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NewsPlexus Media March 17, 2020

BUNCH: Will coronavirus crisis finally change how Americans see the safety net?
"In 2020, a liberal is a conservative who’s been exposed to the coronavirus. It was almost surreal to watch a suddenly kinder, gentler-sounding Mike Pence declare that '(w)hen we tell people, "If you’re sick, stay home," the president has tasked the team with developing economic policies that will make it very, very clear that we’re going to stand by those hard-working Americans,'" writes Will Bunch. "Aren’t these the same people fighting in court to deny health insurance to hard-working Americans with other types of preexisting medical conditions? (Spoiler alert: Yes, they are.)"
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NewsPlexus Media March 17, 2020

GLASSNER: It’s fear, not coronavirus, that’s roiling markets and upending life
"Can we please stop blaming a microbe for things it can’t do? Coronavirus doesn’t make the stock market plunge or schools shut down or empty entire aisles of supermarkets," writes Barry Glassner. "Despite headlines proclaiming 'Coronavirus Roils Markets' and 'Coronavirus Tightens Grip on Daily Life Around the Globe, the virus is incapable of such feats. Those are caused by fears — some rational, some irrational."
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NewsPlexus Media March 17, 2020

UNGER: I’m an American in Italy, where 60 million are trapped. It’s horrific
"Under other circumstances, being homebound here might not seem a bad thing. Not for nothing is this stretch of the Italian Riviera called the Golfo Paradiso, the Gulf of Paradise," writes David C. Unger. "But these circumstances are horrific. Italy is living through a national tragedy of incomprehensible proportions. More than 10,000 people here are ill with the coronavirus and more than 800 have died. Things could get worse, much worse, before they get better. And no one knows when this will end."
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NewsPlexus Media March 14, 2020

GLANTON: GOP is no longer the party of Lincoln. It’s a launching pad for bigots
"The GOP has an image problem. For some reason, bigots and other undesirables seem to think they can run for office as Republicans and win," writes Dahleen Glanton. "Sometimes the candidates are right. More often, they’re wrong. But that’s not the issue. What’s concerning is that there’s something about the Republican Party that makes loathsome candidates think they are welcome there."
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NewsPlexus Media March 14, 2020

BERNSTEIN: Trump’s coronavirus speech was not especially reassuring
"Wow. If there’s been a worse Oval Office address ever, I certainly can’t think of it. All of Donald Trump’s ineptness at the job of presidenting and his personal pathologies came together Wednesday night in a short, awful, counterproductive address to the nation," writes Jonathan Bernstein. "At least he managed to avoid wearing a campaign hat. But this was bad."
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NewsPlexus Media March 14, 2020

LELYVELD: COVID-19 is forcing social distancing; we’ve been doing that for years
"We are in the midst of a pandemic. People suddenly are falling sick. They are dying. We must practice social distancing now — for our own health, to protect the health of others and to fight to keep this coronavirus in check," writes Nita Lelyveld. "But haven’t we been distancing ourselves from each other more and more for years? Isn’t being apart becoming more and more our norm?"
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NewsPlexus Media March 12, 2020

RODRICKS: When it comes to health and quality of life, we get what we pay for
"It takes progressive leadership and real money to have a great country. If we want to live in a place where scientists see problems before they get here, where food is safe and families never go hungry, where children can read and no one is denied health care, where buses run on schedule and the arts flourish, we have to pay for it," writes Dan Rodricks. "We can’t give away trillions of dollars in tax breaks to millionaires and expect them to take care of those things. The rich give some of their money to charities, and charities do a lot of good. But it’s not enough. If we want a great country, we need a smart, vigilant government that’s soundly funded. You get what you pay for."
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NewsPlexus Media March 12, 2020

THORNTON: Kids can’t write cursive. The world won’t end
"Since the late 1800s, when the typewriter struck the first blow to penmanship, handwriting has become an increasingly obsolete skill, and therefore a powerful symbol of the past. It’s an idealized past, when Americans supposedly followed uniform models of appearance and behavior and seemingly obeyed the rules," writes Tamara Plakins Thornton. "That may be a big reason why more than 20 state legislatures, most of them in the South, have passed bills encouraging, even mandating, some form of cursive instruction in the schools. During times of cultural upheaval, when the present looks frightening, nostalgia for old-fashioned handwriting surges."
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NewsPlexus Media March 12, 2020

ZURAWIK: Coronavirus underscores dangers of Trump’s war on truth
"In recent months, I have come to conclude that we in the media didn’t do a very good job of explaining how and why a liar in the White House is so dangerous. I say that because Trump’s followers didn’t seem to understand the kind of damage the president’s war on truth could do to all of us," writes David Zurawik. "Well, maybe now with the coronavirus tearing through a nursing home in Washington state, the death toll rising throughout the nation and the economy melting down like it’s 2008 all over again, people will come to see how dangerous it is to have a president suggesting coronavirus will magically go away in April when the weather warms up or comparing it to the common flu and calling it a Democratic “hoax,” as he did at a recent rally in South Carolina."
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NewsPlexus Media March 11, 2020

SISSON: How to stop a coronavirus epidemic: Change our sick-at-work culture
"President Donald Trump took a lot of flack recently for comments he made about the coronavirus outbreak, including an assertion that because the illness caused by the virus is mild in most cases, many 'go to work, but get better,' writes Paul Sisson. "The president didn’t come right out and say everyone should head on in, regardless of whether they have a cough, fever or other COVID-19 symptoms. But his comments acknowledged that working while sick, in America at least, is commonplace. In doing so, he missed an opportunity to decry this particular practice, public health experts say."
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NewsPlexus Media March 11, 2020

BERNSTEIN: Mick Mulvaney was a deeply unimpressive chief of staff
"Might as well be blunt about it: Mick Mulvaney, ousted Friday evening, was probably the worst White House chief of staff ever. And there’s no reason to believe his replacement, Mark Meadows, will be any better. If anything, he looks like an even worse fit for the job than Mulvaney," writes Jonathan Bernstein. "Mulvaney’s main accomplishment seems to be that he was able to hang on to the job, on an acting basis, for more than 14 months. He apparently didn’t aspire to anything else."
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NewsPlexus Media March 11, 2020

SHARKAWY: Mass panic may be worse than the coronavirus itself
"The coronavirus is here. But fear not. Mass panic is also here. Fear. I’m a doctor and an infectious diseases specialist. I’ve been at this for more than 20 years seeing sick patients on a daily basis. I have worked in inner city hospitals and in the poorest slums of Africa," writes Dr. Abdu Sharkawy. "I am not scared of COVID-19. ... What I am scared about is the loss of reason and wave of fear that has induced the masses of society into a spellbinding spiral of panic, stockpiling obscene quantities of anything that could fill a bomb shelter adequately in a postapocalyptic world."
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NewsPlexus Media March 10, 2020

STEVENS: Why Elizabeth Warren’s exit feels personal to women
"If this week could be summed up in one image, it would be the photo of Jill Biden shoving a vegan protester off her husband’s stage. The photo, shot on Super Tuesday, was celebrated as #Fierce and #JillBidenMVP and #FightLikeAGirl. But all I see is a metaphor for the full-scale, tireless, sometimes ugly struggle that women undertake over and over and over, only to watch all the biggest platforms remain occupied by men," writes Heidi Stevens. "The end of Elizabeth Warren’s candidacy, fewer than 48 hours after that moment was captured, felt like a personal loss. To me, and to a lot of women."
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NewsPlexus Media March 10, 2020

UBINAS: We sure love that diversity — as long as white dudes stay in power
"So we’re down to Joe Biden and Bernie Sanders. All the women with an actual shot, all the people of color, the first openly gay major presidential candidate, they’re out. All out," writes Helen Ubinas. "Despite all the talk about changing demographics and gender equality, our political system still feels like a pasta strainer that clings only to white men in their 70s. Everyone else eventually goes down the drain."
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NewsPlexus Media March 10, 2020

COMMENTARY: Without universal health care, coronavirus puts us all at risk
"The incipient spread of the coronavirus in the United States has laid bare the precarious nature of a health system in which millions of people lack health insurance. The way to avoid rapid spread of the virus is to make sure that people who need access to care get it as soon as possible. But in this country, 30 million people are uninsured and 44 million more are underinsured because they can barely afford to pay the high deductibles and out-of-pocket costs in their plans," write Sara R. Collins and David Blumenthal. "With millions of Americans unable to afford to see a doctor if they become ill with COVID-19, what should we do?"
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NewsPlexus Media March 9, 2020

REED: COVID-19 could worsen depression, divisions in US
"The coronavirus outbreak gathering speed around the world is scary enough," writes Chris Reed. "But even after (and assuming) the virus ultimately fades away, whether its overall impact is akin to the average annual global deaths from seasonal flu — ranging from 291,000 to 646,000 people — much less than that, or much worse, the outbreak seems certain to worsen an existing American epidemic: the high levels of mental illness linked to technology and/or extreme isolation."
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NewsPlexus Media March 9, 2020

GLANTON: The greatest threat to Sanders' revolution isn’t Biden — it’s Trump
"In politics, there is nothing as exhilarating as the resounding energy of young people. Their spirit lifts us and gives us hope that the future will be better than those who have been around a lot longer could imagine," writes Dahleen Glanton. "We are in awe of their dedication to Bernie Sanders, their unwavering belief that he can do all that he says he can — and more. We sometimes find ourselves longing to return to the time we were that optimistic, that trusting and full of hope. The problem with young people, though, is that their enthusiasm is fickle."
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NewsPlexus Media March 9, 2020

GREENMAN: No, Elizabeth Warren’s loss isn’t about sexism
“'Don’t tell me this isn’t about sexism,' is what at least one feminist writer has said about Elizabeth Warren’s failure to win the Democratic nomination. Apologies in advance for mansplaining, but it isn’t about sexism. Warren didn’t lose; she ran a good race, much better than many other men and women in the field. She lasted longer, and was much more successful in setting the terms of the debate," writes Josh Greenman. "What happened was she was the almost-uber-progressive candidate in a race with an uber-progressive candidate, and an uber-progressive who came to the fight with a rabid, fired-up-and-ready-to-go network of support."
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NewsPlexus Media March 4, 2020

GOODMAN: The FCC wants to shut out the public — again
"President Donald Trump is not a big fan of open government. He likes to implement policies without having to deal with annoying inconveniences, like input from the public," writes Paul Goodman. "For example, if you were chair of the Federal Communications Commission and you wanted to spend your time handing out favors to huge phone and internet providers like AT&T, T-Mobile and Comcast, having to consider public input would be quite a nuisance. That’s what is happening right now, on an issue that affects nearly everyone."
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NewsPlexus Media March 4, 2020

HILTZIK: Coronavirus crisis exposes stupidity of Trump’s health care policies
"Until now, President Trump’s approach to health care was alarming chiefly to discrete populations such as low-income families, immigrants, people with preexisting conditions and seniors. They were in the crosshairs of initiatives to hamstring Medicaid, prevent undocumented residents from seeking medical treatment, destroy the Affordable Care Act and raise the cost of Medicare," writes Michael Hiltzik. "But the world has been changed by the novel coronavirus. Now it’s clear that all these initiatives present a health care threat to everyone."
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NewsPlexus Media March 4, 2020

HEALEY: Did you vote early in California’s presidential primary? Sorry
"Within days of former Vice President Joe Biden’s dominant victory in South Carolina, the race for the Democratic nomination for president clarified dramatically," writes Jon Healey. "Biden’s two leading opponents in the party’s moderate wing — Sen. Amy Klobuchar (D-Minn.) and former South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete Buttigieg — dropped out of the contest. That leaves only five major candidates still running, including the current leader, Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.). So much for moving California’s primary up a few months to make it more relevant."
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NewsPlexus Media March 3, 2020

KAMIN: Judge gets it right blasting Chicago’s attempt to restrict free speech
"Millennium Park’s website calls the spectacular downtown Chicago public space 'a new kind of town square.' It is indeed a new kind of town square — one where aesthetic busybodies from the city of Chicago and the foundation that supports the park are trying to severely limit the time-honored right to free speech in public spaces," writes Blair Kamin. "Recently, U.S. District Judge John Robert Blakey rightly blasted the city’s restrictions and issued a preliminary injunction that temporarily bars the city from putting unreasonable curbs on activists who hand out leaflets or hold demonstrations."
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NewsPlexus Media March 3, 2020

SCHMICH: Hey, all you face-touchers out there, in an age of coronavirus — stop!
"Stop touching your face. I mean it! Stop. Touching. Your. Face. Did you just touch your face? You probably did," writes Mary Schmich. "I’d bet 82% of readers have touched their face since beginning this column. I know this because it’s almost impossible for the average person to go half a minute without wiping their eyes or their nose or their mouth, without scratching their cheek or their brow or their chin, without indulging in the compulsive hand-to-face behaviors that remind us we’re not that far removed from the chimpanzees."
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NewsPlexus Media March 3, 2020

MCMANUS: Trump needs trust, not purges, to face coronavirus
"Can we be confident that Trump and his aides are doing everything they can to stop what is now a limited outbreak in the United States from becoming an epidemic, as it has in China, Italy and other countries?Are they letting the government’s best scientists and emergency planners handle the problem without political interference?" writes Doyle McManus. "The early signs aren’t encouraging."
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NewsPlexus Media March 1, 2020

"When the Trump administration officially announced its most recent nominees to fill vacancies on the Federal Reserve Board, they were listed as 'Judy Shelton, of Virginia' and 'Christopher Waller, of Missouri.' But when the nominations were forwarded to the Senate a dozen days later, they were listed as 'Judy Shelton, of California' and 'Christopher Waller, of Minnesota,'" writes George Selgin. "What gives? It’s a shady tactic commonly practiced as part of the Fed’s nominating and confirmation process. It involves skirting a once rigorously enforced Federal Reserve requirement about geographical diversity on the Fed Board of Governors. Now that requirement has become something of a sham."
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NewsPlexus Media March 1, 2020

FELDMAN: Trump's Sotomayor slam is a swipe at the Supreme Court
"Here's the good news about President Donald Trump's call for Justices Sonia Sotomayor and Ruth Bader Ginsburg to recuse themselves from all future cases involving his administration: It won't move the two stalwart liberal justices an inch," writes Noah Feldman. "Better still, questions of any justices' recusals are decided by— you guessed it — the justices themselves. Sotomayor and Ginsburg can do whatever they want, and that isn't going to include being pushed around by Trump, or by anyone else for that matter. Nevertheless, it's serious business that Trump has suggested that there were 'obviously inappropriate' things in Sotomayor's recent dissent criticizing his administration for repeatedly seeking emergency actions from the Supreme Court. Trump is wrong."
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NewsPlexus Media March 1, 2020

MCFEATTERS: We’re paying the price for Trump’s cuts
"We’ve suddenly leaped into a real-life thriller movie where the scientists are frantically and futilely warning about a pandemic and the political leaders are pooh-poohing it, determined to squelch fear that might hurt business," writes Ann McFeatters. "One of Donald Trump’s potentially most fateful acts as president in 2018 was firing the scientist in charge of preparing for a pandemic – a disease that sweeps the globe too fast to be contained — and axing the global health team. Unpersuaded that he might face a global disease catastrophe, this year Trump is proposing a 16% cut in the budget of the Centers for Disease Control and a $3 billion cut for the National Institutes for Health. We’re about to pay the price."
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NewsPlexus Media February 28, 2020

LEUBSDORF: The enduring mystery of Trump and Russia
"It’s no secret why Vladimir Putin would want Donald Trump reelected: no other American president would have been as forgiving of his efforts to create chaos and destabilize the Western alliance," writes Carl P. Leubsdorf. "But the mystery remains why Trump has been such a willing participant, repeatedly excusing Putin for everything from aggression toward Ukraine to meddling in American elections."
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NewsPlexus Media February 28, 2020

RUBIN: Leaders of world’s two most important democracies trash rule of law
"To understand the growing global threats to democracy, you only had to follow President Donald Trump’s two-day visit to India this week," writes Trudy Rubin. "While this visit produced little substance, in better times it might have had huge symbolic significance. It could have advertised the virtues of the world’s two most important democracies in contrast to the authoritarian model of China. Instead, these two leaders displayed their disdain for rule of law and their embrace of a virulent strain of populist nationalism that is infecting democracies around the world."
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