Sorry, but Notd.io is not available without javascript Climate Matters - Notd.io
Collapse Menu

Filter By Location

Filter by Media

...
...

Climate Matters

(*)(*)(*)(*)(*)
Total Subscribers 0

The latest news on the environment and global climate change, the impact it is having on communities everywhere, and what is being done (or not being done) to save the planet. || News Plexus LLC — delivering your news in a convenient, AD-FREE and easy-to-read stream.

The latest news on the environment and global climate change, the impact it is having on communities everywhere, and what is being done (or not being done) to save the planet. || News Plexus LLC — delivering your news in a convenient, AD-FREE and easy-to-read stream.
Stream´s subscription plans

newsnews worldenvironmenttype-text

NewsPlexus Media January 17, 2020

Environmental issues top worries for those heading to Davos
Following another year of extreme heat and ice sheet melt, environmental issues are now considered to be the top five long-term risks confronting the global economy, organizers of next week's gathering of elites in the Swiss resort of Davos said Wednesday. Citing a survey of more than 750 key decision-makers, the World Economic Forum said catastrophic trends like global warming and the extinction of animal species would be front and center at next week's meeting.
Read More

newsenvironmentnews ustype-text

NewsPlexus Media January 17, 2020

Researchers tie massive Pacific seabird die-off to heat wave
Hundreds of thousands of common murres, a fast-flying seabird, died from starvation four winters ago in the North Pacific, and a new research paper attempts to explain why. Common murres were ambushed by effects of the northeast Pacific marine heatwave dubbed "The Blob."
Read More

newsnews ustype-text

NewsPlexus Media January 13, 2020

Second day of record warmth bathes parts of New England
Bostonians ditched their parkas, mittens and thermal underwear for a second day as record-breaking warm temperatures again bathed the region in springlike temperatures. In Boston, the mercury reached a wildly unseasonable 72 degrees Fahrenheit.
Read More

newsnews worldenvironmenttype-text

NewsPlexus Media January 12, 2020

Mexican environmental authorities said Thursday that 292 sea turtles found dead on the country's southern Pacific coast since Christmas died as a result of a red tide algae bloom.
Read More

newsnews worldenvironmenttype-text

NewsPlexus Media January 12, 2020

China mourns native paddlefish scientists say is now extinct
The Chinese paddlefish's sharp, protruding snout made it one of the largest freshwater species in the world. Since scientists declared it extinct in a research paper published last week, Chinese internet users and media outlets have been paying tribute to the hefty creature.
Read More

newsenvironmentnews ustype-text

NewsPlexus Media December 29, 2019

Slippery salvation: Could seaweed as cow feed help climate?
Coastal Maine has a lot of seaweed, and a fair number of cows. A group of scientists and farmers think that pairing the two could help unlock a way to cope with a warming world. The researchers — from a marine science lab, an agriculture center and universities in northern New England — are working on a plan to feed seaweed to cows to gauge whether that can help reduce the greenhouse gas emissions that contribute to climate change.
Read More

newsenvironmentnews ustype-text

NewsPlexus Media December 29, 2019

Nebraska town's grim choice: Can it pick up and move?
It took only minutes for the icy Elkhorn River to surge over a levee and engulf tiny Winslow, but months after the floodwaters receded, the village finds itself struggling to decide its future — or if it has a future. Will it be reborn atop a nearby hill, or will the town stay put, living under a dark cloud?
Read More

newsenvironmentnews ustype-text

NewsPlexus Media December 28, 2019

Sustainability in the fashion industry faces an uphill climb
Sustainability in fashion is a hot button topic, with retailers large and small racing to prove their green credentials, but the desire for new attire churns and the industry remains one of the world's largest polluters as climate activists and watchdogs sound alarms. The industry is the second largest consumer of water and is responsible for 8-10% of global carbon emissions, more than all international flights and maritime shipping combined.
Read More

newsnews usenvironmenttype-text

NewsPlexus Media December 28, 2019

West Coast fishery rebounds in rare conservation 'home run'
A rare environmental success story is unfolding in waters off the U.S. West Coast. After years of fear and uncertainty, bottom trawler fishermen — those who use nets to scoop up rockfish, bocaccio, sole, Pacific Ocean perch and other deep-dwelling fish — are making a comeback here, reinventing themselves as a sustainable industry less than two decades after authorities closed huge stretches of the Pacific Ocean because of the species' depletion.
Read More

newsenvironmentnews ustype-text

NewsPlexus Media December 28, 2019

Innovative fashion designers lead the way on sustainability
Innovative fashion designers are turning to such things as horseradish and nettles to make sustainable clothing and accessories to the delight of a growing number of buyers. While more consumers are paying closer attention to how the production of goods impacts the environment, old habits die hard. A buy-and-toss mentality persists despite a boost from celebrities helping to drive the upcycle and vintage movements.
Read More

newsenvironmentnews ustype-text

NewsPlexus Media December 28, 2019

In New Jersey, a slow-motion evacuation from climate change
The state has bought and torn down 145 homes since 2013 in Woodbridge, New Jersey, with eight homes demolished this month alone. Dozens more are slated to be torn down in the near future. It's all part of an effort to get ahead of climate change. Some neighborhoods in this town of over 100,000 residents just off the bustling New Jersey Turnpike are projected to be partly or fully underwater in coming decades as global sea levels rise.
Read More

newsenvironmentnews ustype-text

NewsPlexus Media December 28, 2019

Scientists struggle to save seagrass from coastal pollution
Seagrass beds in New Hampshire and along shorelines around the world are important because they have been found to provide food and shelter for fish, shellfish and sea turtles. They also blunt the impacts of ocean acidification, reduce coastal erosion and keep the water clean by filtering out excessive nutrients. Their comeback in the Great Bay gives hope for recovery elsewhere.
Read More

newsenvironmentnews ustype-text

NewsPlexus Media December 20, 2019

Audubon's annual Christmas Bird Count stronger than ever
Ít's been 120 years since New York ornithologist Frank Chapman launched his Christmas Bird Count as a bold new alternative to what had been a longtime Christmas tradition of hunting birds. The annual count continues, stronger and more important than ever. “He realized that we were over-harvesting birds and something had to be done,” says Geoff LeBaron, who has led The National Audubon Society's massive community science effort for more than 30 years.
Read More

newsnews worldenvironmenttype-text

NewsPlexus Media December 18, 2019

Disappointment as marathon climate talks end with slim deal
Marathon U.N. climate talks ended Sunday with a slim compromise that sparked widespread disappointment, after major polluters resisted calls for ramping up efforts to keep global warming at bay and negotiators postponed debate about rules for international carbon markets for another year. Organizers kept delegates from almost 200 nations in Madrid far beyond Friday's scheduled close of the two-week talks. In the end, negotiators endorsed a general call for greater efforts to tackle climate change and several measures to help poor countries respond and adapt to its impacts.
Read More

newsnews statenews usenvironmenttype-text

NewsPlexus Media December 16, 2019

Documents: Mining company writing own environmental report
Documents show the Trump administration intervening in a U.S. Forest Service decision so that a Canadian company could write a key environmental report on its proposed open-pit gold mines in central Idaho. The report, called a biological assessment, would typically be written by the Forest Service or an independent contractor. Its purpose is to examine the potential effect the open-pit mines would have on salmon, steelhead and bull trout protected under the Endangered Species Act.
Read More

newsenvironmentnews worldtype-text

NewsPlexus Media December 16, 2019

UN chief warns against 'survival of the richest' on climate
Failure to tackle global warming could result in economic disaster, the United Nations Secretary-General warned Thursday in Madrid, as negotiators at the U.N. climate talks remained deadlocked over key issues. António Guterres said unrestrained climate change would allow only the “survival of the richest," while former U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry said the “absence of leadership” from Washington was a big obstacle in the talks.
Read More

newsenvironmentnews usnews statetype-text

NewsPlexus Media December 15, 2019

California considers requiring zero emission truck sales
The country's most populous state could become the first to require a portion of new truck sales be electric or "zero emission" vehicles as California grapples with how to clean up its worst-in-the nation air quality. Home to the two largest ports in the country in Los Angeles and Long Beach, California has roughly 1.5 million medium and heavy duty trucks on the road that spew harmful pollutants as they haul freight to warehouses. The state's transportation sector accounts for 41% of all greenhouse gas emissions, a cause of climate change, and is a major source of ozone and particulate matter pollution that can cause respiratory problems.
Read More

newsnews usscienceenvironmenttype-text

NewsPlexus Media December 15, 2019

A fan mussel found only in the Mediterranean was officially added to the list of critically endangered species, after scientists recorded a dramatic decline in its population numbers caused by a newly discovered pathogen. The International Union for Conservation of Nature said in a press release this week that its updated Red List includes the noble pen shell, or Pinna nobilis, the Mediterranean's largest mollusk.
Read More

newsnews ustype-text

NewsPlexus Media December 14, 2019

Trump mocks global warming, lowballs sea level rise
At a campaign rally, President Donald Trump mocked concerns about global warming, saying that oceans would rise just “one-eighth of an inch within the next 250 years.” Although Trump’s comment may have been a joke — and not intended to be a prediction of sea level rise — his figure is many times lower than scientific estimates. According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, global sea level is currently increasing by about an eighth of an inch per year, not an eighth of an inch over two-and-a-half centuries. The Trump campaign did not respond to a request for comment.
Read More

newsnews usnews stateenvironmenttype-text

NewsPlexus Media December 12, 2019

California commission lists yellow-legged frog as endangered
There's new hope for an endangered California frog that has vanished from half of its habitat. The state Fish and Game Commission on Wednesday approved protections for five of six populations of the foothill yellow-legged frog.
Read More

newsenvironmentnews worldtype-text

NewsPlexus Media December 10, 2019

Too much of a Greta thing? Activist urges focus on others
With dozens of cameras pointing at her across a room full of reporters, celebrity teen environmentalist Greta Thunberg had an unexpected message: Look the other way. "Our stories have been told over and over again," the 16-year-old Swede said, explaining why she and prominent German activist Luisa Neubauer would be handing over the stage at the U.N. climate meeting in Madrid to other young activists.
Read More

newsenvironmentnews worldtype-text

NewsPlexus Media December 9, 2019

Nobel laureate: Face up to climate change, no escaping Earth
An astronomer who shares this year's Nobel physics prize for discovering a planet outside the Earth's solar system is taking issue with people who shrug off climate change on the grounds that humans will eventually leave for distant planets. Didier Queloz was one of several Nobel laureates who spoke about climate change at a news conference Saturday in Stockholm. "I think this is just irresponsible, because the stars are so far away I think we should not have any serious hope to escape the Earth," Queloz said.
Read More

newsenvironmentnews ustype-text

NewsPlexus Media December 9, 2019

Climate scientists try to cut their own carbon footprints
Some climate scientists and activists are limiting their flying, their consumption of meat and their overall carbon footprints to avoid adding to the global warming they study.
Read More

newsenvironmentnews ustype-text

NewsPlexus Media December 9, 2019

US feels the heat as Trump pulls out of global climate pact
President Donald Trump is aiming to make the annual U.N.-sponsored climate talks underway in Madrid the last ones for full participation by the United States, which is the world's No. 1 economy and the second-biggest carbon emitter. Trump dismisses climate change and he thumbed his nose at previous climate talks by twice sending White House delegations to promote climate-degrading coal. He is due to complete the U.S. withdrawal from the landmark Paris global climate accord on Nov. 4, 2020, the day after next year's U.S. presidential election.
Read More

newsenvironmentnews ustype-text

NewsPlexus Media December 6, 2019

Greta Thunberg says voyage 'energized' her climate fight
Climate activist Greta Thunberg told cheering supporters Tuesday that her three-week journey across the Atlantic had "energized" her for the fight against climate change as she arrived in Portugal. The Swedish teen, whose one-woman protests outside the Swedish parliament helped inspire a global youth movement, sailed into the port of Lisbon after making a last-minute dash back from the United States to attend this year's U.N. climate conference.
Read More

newsnews ustype-text

NewsPlexus Media December 6, 2019

Greta Thunberg’s North Dakota photo is at national library
A photo of Swedish climate activist Greta Thunberg at a Native American reservation in North Dakota has been archived at the Library of Congress in Washington. Shane Balkowitsch, who took the photo, preserved the image on a glass plate and titled it “Standing For Us All.” Balkowitsch told the Bismarck Tribune that it’s his “most important work to date.”
Read More

newsenvironmentnews worldtype-text

NewsPlexus Media December 6, 2019

China’s climate paradox: A leader in coal and clean energy
As world leaders gather in Spain to discuss how to slow the warming of the planet, a spotlight falls on China — the top emitter of greenhouse gases. China burns about half the coal used globally each year. Between 2000 and 2018, its annual carbon emissions nearly tripled, and it now accounts for about 30% of the world’s total. Yet it’s also the leading market for solar panels, wind turbines and electric vehicles, and it manufactures about two-thirds of solar cells installed worldwide.
Read More

newsenvironmentnews usnews worldtype-text

NewsPlexus Media December 5, 2019

Global carbon pollution continues to rise, but more slowly
The world continues to increase the amount of heat-trapping carbon dioxide it pumps into the air, but it’s not rising as fast as in the previous couple years. Led by big jumps from China and India, the world is projected to spew 40.57 billion tons of carbon dioxide into the air in 2019. That's up nearly 255 million tons from 2018, according to two scientific studies released Tuesday. The studies by Global Carbon Project, a group of international scientists who track emissions, show a 0.6% increase from last year.
Read More

newsnews worldenvironmenttype-text

NewsPlexus Media December 4, 2019

New EU leaders take office vowing to tackle climate change
A new team of leaders took office at the helm of the European Union on Sunday, pledging to put the fight against climate change at the top of their agenda and foster European unity despite the likely departure of Britain from the 28-nation bloc.
Read More

newsenvironmentnews ustype-text

NewsPlexus Media December 2, 2019

UN chief warns of ‘point of no return’ on climate change
U.N. Secretary-General Antonio Guterres said Sunday that the world’s efforts to stop climate change have been “utterly inadequate" so far and there is a danger global warming could pass the “point of no return.” Speaking before the start Monday of a two-week international climate conference in Madrid, the U.N. chief said the impact of rising temperatures — including more extreme weather — is already being felt around the world, with dramatic consequences for humans and other species.
Read More

newsenvironmentnews worldtype-text

NewsPlexus Media December 1, 2019

Climate activists invade east German coal mines in protest
Climate activists protested at open-pit coal mines in eastern Germany, pouring onto the premises to urge the government to immediately halt the use of coal to produce electricity.
Read More

newsenvironmentnews ustype-text

NewsPlexus Media December 1, 2019

Activists warn Balkan rivers at risk from hydropower plants
Unspoiled rivers in the Balkans are facing new dangers from small hydropower plants that have sprouted up across the region in recent years, environmental experts warned Thursday. In a declaration issued after a meeting in the Bosnian capital Sarajevo, they urged Balkan governments to halt any further construction of hydro dams. "We want everybody to see that it is bad, and it is wrong and that we are devastating our natural beauties," said Irma Popovic Dujmovic, from World Wide Fund for Nature Adria group.
Read More

newsenvironmentnews ustype-text

NewsPlexus Media November 28, 2019

In Florida and elsewhere, GOP pressured over climate change
Since taking office in January, Florida’s Republican governor has appointed a science officer, established a climate change czar and pledged to spend billions of dollars to restore the Everglades and combat the pollutants that spawn blue-green algae and red tides. A top Republican lawmaker in the state, meanwhile, recently stood on the House floor and implored his party “to stop being afraid of words like ‘climate change’ and ‘sea level rise.’”
Read More

newsenvironmentnews ustype-text

NewsPlexus Media November 28, 2019

Failing ice cellars signal changes in Alaska whaling towns
For generations, people in Alaska's far-north villages have relied on hand-built ice cellars dug deep into the permafrost to age their whale and walrus meat to perfection and keep it cold throughout the year. Now, a growing number of these underground cellars are being rendered unreliable as global warming and other modern factors force changes to an ancient way of life. Some whaling villages are working to adapt as more cellars — some stocked with tons of subsistence food — turn up with pooling water and mold
Read More

newsenvironmentnews ustype-text

NewsPlexus Media November 28, 2019

Above-ground power lines grow in risk as climate changes
Trees toppling onto above-ground power lines spark wildfires, more than 1,000 of them in the last decade in California alone. The wires snap in blizzards and hurricanes, causing dayslong outages. Everywhere, power poles topple in all kinds of disasters, blocking escape routes. Around the U.S., dealing with the vulnerability of overhead power lines — one of many problems that experts say will only get worse as the climate deteriorates — by burying them or strengthening them is spotty and disorganized on a national level, and painfully slow, at best.
Read More

newsenvironmentnews statenews ustype-text

NewsPlexus Media November 28, 2019

Agency agrees to designate habitat for threatened ice seals
A federal agency will decide by September how much ocean and coast in northern Alaska will be designated as critical habitat for two ice seal species. The Center for Biological Diversity announced Monday it had reached an agreement with the Commerce Department for the Trump administration to issue a critical habitat rule for ringed and bearded seals.
Read More

newsenvironmentnews worldtype-text

NewsPlexus Media November 28, 2019

UN: ‘Quick wins’ needed to keep climate goals within reach
Countries need to begin making steep cuts to their greenhouse gas emissions immediately or risk missing the targets they’ve agreed for limiting global warming, with potentially dire consequences, senior United Nations officials said Tuesday. A report by the U.N. Environment Program, published days before governments gather in Madrid for an annual meeting on climate change, showed the amount of planet-heating gases being pumped into the atmosphere hitting a new high last year, despite a near-global pledge to reduce them.
Read More

newsnews usenvironmentsportstype-text

NewsPlexus Media November 25, 2019

Harvard-Yale game delayed by student protest; 20-30 arrested
Protesters wearing the colors of both Harvard and Yale staged a sit-in at midfield of Yale Bowl during halftime of the 136th edition of the annual football rivalry known as The Game. Most walked off after about an hour with a police escort; about 20-30 who remained were arrested. A few dozen protesters initially trickled onto the field as the Yale band finished performing its halftime routine, some holding a banner asking the schools' presidents to divest from the fossil fuel industry. Other signs referred to Puerto Rican debt and the treatment of the Uighurs.
Read More

newsnews usenvironmenttype-text

NewsPlexus Media November 24, 2019

Blame the Grinch or Mother Nature, but the annual Christmas in Ice sculpture park won’t open this year in North Pole, Alaska, because of a lack of ice. It’s the first cancellation since the event started 14 years ago in the city where Christmas is celebrated year-round and city light poles are decorated like candy canes.
Read More

newsenvironmentnews usnews statetype-text

NewsPlexus Media November 24, 2019

US agency to consider expanded drilling in Alaska reserve
The Trump administration will consider a new management plan and expanded oil drilling for the National Petroleum Reserve-Alaska, an Indiana-size area that former Interior Secretary Ken Salazar characterized as an "iconic place on our Earth." The Bureau of Land Management announced Thursday it will take public comment through Jan. 21 on four alternatives for the reserve in northern Alaska.
Read More

newsnews usenvironmentnews statetype-text

NewsPlexus Media November 23, 2019

Warm ocean water delays sea ice for Alaska towns, wildlife
The U.S. research vessel Sikuliaq can break through ice as thick as 2.5 feet. In the Chukchi Sea northwest of Alaska this month, which should be brimming with floes, its limits likely won't be tested. University of Washington researchers left Nome on Nov. 7 on the 261-foot ship, crossed through the Bering Strait and will record observations at multiple sites including Utqiaġvik, formerly Barrow, America's northernmost community. Sea ice is creeping toward the city from the east in the Beaufort Sea, but to find sea ice in the Chukchi, the Sikuliaq would have to head northwest for about 200 miles.
Read More

newsenvironmentnews ustype-text

NewsPlexus Media November 21, 2019

2 insect species classified as threatened as glaciers melt
The continued existence of two species of insects is in doubt because climate change is melting away the glaciers and year-round snowfields they depend on, U.S. wildlife officials said Wednesday. The western glacier stonefly and the meltwater lednian stonefly found in the northern Rocky Mountains will be protected as threatened species under the federal Endangered Species Act. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service officials said.
Read More

newsenvironmentnews worldtype-text

NewsPlexus Media November 21, 2019

Smoke blankets Sydney as wildfires spread across Australia
Hazardous smoke blanketed Sydney on Thursday as wildfires burned across eastern and southern Australia. Thick smog shrouded Australia's most populous city, leaving its iconic skyline barely visible two days after smoke created serious air quality issues.
Read More

newsenvironmentnews usnews worldtype-text

NewsPlexus Media November 21, 2019

Gore kicking off 24 hours of climate talks around the world
Former Vice President Al Gore kicked off a series of climate presentations on Wednesday evening that will continue around the globe over 24 hours, a lively talk espousing political and U.S. policy changes. The event, called "24 Hours of Reality" is an endeavor of The Climate Reality Project, founded by Gore to educate the public and inspire action on climate change.
Read More

newsnews usenvironmenttype-text

NewsPlexus Media November 20, 2019

23 states widen challenge to Trump administration car rules
California on Friday broadened its effort to block the Trump administration from ending its authority to set greenhouse gas emission and fuel economy standards for cars and trucks. It was joined by 22 states, the District of Columbia and two cities in suing the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, building on a similar lawsuit it filed in September a day after the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration withdrew California's waiver.
Read More

newsenvironmentnews ustype-text

NewsPlexus Media November 14, 2019

The most destructive hurricanes are hitting US more often
Big, destructive hurricanes are hitting the U.S. three times more frequently than they did a century ago, according to a new study. Experts generally measure a hurricane's destruction by adding up how much damage it did to people and cities. That can overlook storms that are powerful, but that hit only sparsely populated areas. A Danish research team came up with a new measurement that looked at just the how big and strong the hurricane was, not how much money it cost. They call it Area of Total Destruction.
Read More

newsenvironmentnews ustype-text

NewsPlexus Media November 14, 2019

Hyatt will remove small bottles from hotel bathrooms by 2021
Hyatt Hotels Corp. is the latest hotel company to say it’s removing small bottles from its bathrooms in an effort to reduce waste.
Read More

newsnews ustype-text

NewsPlexus Media November 12, 2019

Mural of activist Greta Thunberg going up in San Francisco
Teen climate activist Greta Thunberg is staring down at pedestrians in the heart of San Francisco where an artist is painting a massive mural of the Nobel Peace Prize nominee.
Read More

newsnews usenvironmenttype-text

NewsPlexus Media November 9, 2019

Iconic Pacific bird sanctuary ravaged by plastic and death
Flying into the uninhabited Northwestern Hawaiian Islands, Midway Atoll appears out of the vast blue Pacific as a tiny oasis of coral-fringed land with pristine white sand beaches that are teeming with life. But on the ground, there's a different scene: plastic, pollution and death.
Read More

newsenvironmentnews ustype-text

NewsPlexus Media November 7, 2019

New Zealand passes law aimed at combating climate change
New Zealand lawmakers on Thursday joined forces across the aisle to pass a bill aimed at combating climate change. The Zero Carbon bill aims to make New Zealand reduce its greenhouse gas emissions to the point the country becomes mostly carbon neutral by 2050. It gives some leeway to farmers, however, who bring in much of the country's foreign income.
Read More