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The latest news on the environment and global climate change, the impact it is having on communities everywhere, and what is being done (or not being done) to save the planet. || News Plexus LLC — delivering your news in a convenient, AD-FREE and easy-to-read stream.

The latest news on the environment and global climate change, the impact it is having on communities everywhere, and what is being done (or not being done) to save the planet. || News Plexus LLC — delivering your news in a convenient, AD-FREE and easy-to-read stream.
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NewsPlexus Media October 15, 2020

Earth breaks September heat record, may reach warmest year
Earth sweltered to a record hot September last month, with U.S. climate officials saying there’s nearly a two-to-one chance that 2020 will end up as the globe’s hottest year on record. Boosted by human-caused climate change, global temperatures averaged 60.75 degrees (15.97 Celsius) last month, edging out 2015 and 2016 for the hottest September in 141 years of recordkeeping, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration said Wednesday. That’s 1.75 degrees (0.97 degrees Celsius) above the 20th century average.
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NewsPlexus Media October 15, 2020

UN: Climate change means more weather disasters every year
In the wake of heat waves, global warming, forest fires, storms, droughts and a rising number of hurricanes, the U.N. weather agency warned Tuesday that the number of people who need international humanitarian help could rise 50% by 2030 compared to the 108 million who needed it worldwide in 2018. In a new report released with partners, the World Meteorological Agency says more disasters attributed to weather are taking place each year. It said over 11,000 disasters have been attributed to weather, climate and phenomena like tsunamis that are related to water over the last 50 years — causing 2 million deaths and racking up $3.6 trillion worth of economic costs.
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NewsPlexus Media October 13, 2020

Scientists return from Arctic with wealth of climate data
An icebreaker carrying scientists on a year-long international effort to study the high Arctic has returned to its home port in Germany carrying a wealth of data that will help researchers better predict climate change in the decades to come. The RV Polarstern arrived Monday in the North Sea port of Bremerhaven, from where she set off more than a year ago prepared for bitter cold and polar bear encounters — but not for the pandemic lockdowns that almost scuttled the mission half-way through.
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NewsPlexus Media October 6, 2020

Texas energy expert: ‘Industry will continue to lead the way' on environment
As BP reported oil demand will decline even as energy demand increases, the energy giant continues to diversify into the renewables energy market. The ultimate impact on the industry remains to be seen, Todd Staples, president of the Texas Oil & Gas Association, told The Center Square.
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NewsPlexus Media October 4, 2020

Much of U.S. Southwest left parched after monsoon season
Cities across the U.S. Southwest recorded their driest monsoon season on record this year, some with only a trace or no rain. The seasonal weather pattern that runs from mid-June and ended Wednesday brings high hopes for rain and cloud coverage to cool down places like Las Vegas and Phoenix. But like last year, it largely was a dud, leaving the region parched.
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NewsPlexus Media October 3, 2020

England bans plastic straws after pandemic-linked delay
A ban on plastic straws, drink stirrers and cotton buds took effect Thursday in England after a six-month delay caused by the coronavirus pandemic. Retailers are barred from selling or supplying the disposable items as part of efforts to cut down on pollution from single-use plastics.
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NewsPlexus Media October 1, 2020

Getting warmer: Trump concedes human role in climate change
President Donald Trump publicly acknowledged that humans bear some blame for climate change, but scientists say the president still isn't dealing with the reality of our primary role. Pressed repeatedly in Tuesday night's debate, Trump gave one of his fullest accountings yet of what scientists say is an escalating climate crisis threatening every aspect of life. Pushed by moderator Chris Wallace, and at one point by rival Joe Biden, Trump also pushed back on scientific findings that his environmental rollbacks would increase climate-damaging pollution.
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NewsPlexus Media September 30, 2020

A lawyer for former Trump administration national security adviser Michael Flynn told a judge Tuesday that she recently updated President Donald Trump on the case and asked him not to issue a pardon for her client. The attorney, Sidney Powell, was initially reluctant to discuss her conversations with the president or the White House, saying she believed they were protected by executive privilege. But under persistent questioning from U.S. District Judge Emmet Sullivan, she acknowledged having spoken to the president within the last few weeks to update him and to request that he not pardon Flynn.
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NewsPlexus Media September 30, 2020

Leaders to UN: If virus doesn't kill us, climate change will
In a year of cataclysm, some world leaders at this week’s annual United Nations meeting are taking the long view, warning: If COVID-19 doesn't kill us, climate change will. With Siberia seeing its warmest temperature on record this year and enormous chunks of ice caps in Greenland and Canada sliding into the sea, countries are acutely aware there's no vaccine for global warming.
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NewsPlexus Media September 28, 2020

Greta Thunberg and youth climate protests make a return
Teenage environmental activist Greta Thunberg is back. She joined fellow demonstrators outside the Swedish Parliament on Friday to kick off a day of socially distanced global climate protests. "The main hope is, as always, to try to have an impact on the level of awareness and public opinion so that people will start becoming more aware," the 17-year-old told reporters.
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NewsPlexus Media September 24, 2020

China, top global emitter, aims to go carbon-neutral by 2060
Chinese President Xi Jinping says his country will aim to stop adding to the global warming problem by 2060. Xi's announcement during a speech Tuesday to the U.N. General Assembly is a significant step for the world's biggest emitter of greenhouse gases.
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NewsPlexus Media September 24, 2020

From LA to Oslo, 12 cities pledge to divest from fossil fuel
Ten cities around the world on Tuesday joined New York and London in committing to divest from fossil fuel companies as part of efforts to combat climate change.
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NewsPlexus Media September 23, 2020

Warming shrinks Arctic Ocean ice to second lowest on record
Ice in the Arctic Ocean melted to its second lowest level on record this summer, triggered by global warming along with natural forces, U.S. scientists reported Monday. The extent of ice-covered ocean at the North Pole and extending further south to Alaska, Canada, Greenland and Russia reached its summertime low of 1.4 million square miles last week before starting to grow again. Arctic sea ice reaches its low point in September and its high in March after the winter.
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NewsPlexus Media September 20, 2020

New Jersey law seeks to stem pollution in minority areas
Gov. Phil Murphy signed into law Friday a measure giving state regulators power to deny development permits to businesses whose operations pollute predominantly Black and other minority communities. Murphy, a Democrat, cast the legislation in sweeping terms, calling it historic and saying it amounted to a"monumental reform" that puts New Jersey at the forefront nationally of what is known as environmental justice legislation.
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NewsPlexus Media September 20, 2020

Flooding affects more than 1 million across East Africa
Flooding has affected well over a million people across East Africa, another calamity threatening food security on top of a historic locust outbreak and the coronavirus pandemic. The Nile River has hit its highest levels in a half-century under heavy seasonal rainfall, and large parts of Sudan, Ethiopia and South Sudan have been swamped amid worries about climate change.
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NewsPlexus Media September 19, 2020

Apple to launch first online store in India next week
Apple announced Friday that it will launch its first online store in India next week, as it seeks to increase sales in one of the world's fastest-growing smartphone markets. The company at present uses third-party online and offline retailers to sell its products in the country.
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NewsPlexus Media September 19, 2020

US Embassy in Kabul warns of extremist attacks against women
The U.S. Embassy in Afghanistan warned that extremists groups are planning attacks against a “variety of targets” but are taking particular aim at women. The warning didn't specify which organizations were plotting the attacks. But it comes as the Taliban and government-appointed negotiators are sitting together for the first time to try to find a peaceful end to decades of relentless war.
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NewsPlexus Media September 19, 2020

UN chief: Don't 'throw away' stimulus money on fossil fuels
U.N. Secretary-General Antonio Guterres called Thursday on governments not to “throw away” economic stimulus funds by supporting fossil fuel industries that contribute to global warming. Speaking at a virtual conference on climate change, Guterres noted that countries have “a choice of two paths” as they mobilize trillions of dollars of taxpayers' money for economic recovery in the wake of the coronavirus pandemic.
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NewsPlexus Media September 18, 2020

World isn't meeting biodiversity goals, UN report finds
A decade-long global effort to save Earth's disappearing species and declining ecosystems has mostly stumbled, with fragile habitats like coral reefs and tropical forests in more trouble than ever, researchers said in a report Tuesday. In 2010, more than 150 countries agreed to goals to protect nature, but the new United Nations scorecard found that the world has largely failed to meet 20 different targets to safeguard species and ecosystems.
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NewsPlexus Media September 18, 2020

Water shortages in US West likelier than previously thought
There's a chance water levels in the two largest man-made reservoirs in the United States could dip to critically low levels by 2025, jeopardizing the steady flow of Colorado River water that more than 40 million people rely on in the American West. After a relatively dry summer, the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation released models on Tuesday suggesting looming shortages in Lake Powell and Lake Mead — the reservoirs where Colorado River water is stored — are more likely than previously projected.
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NewsPlexus Media September 17, 2020

Wildfire smoke brings haze, vivid sunsets to East Coast
The smoke from dozens of wildfires in the western United States is stretching clear across the country — and even pushing into Mexico, Canada and Europe. While the dangerous plumes are forcing people inside along the West Coast, residents thousands of miles away in the East are seeing unusually hazy skies and remarkable sunsets. The wildfires racing across tinder-dry landscape in California, Idaho, Oregon and Washington are extraordinary, but the long reach of their smoke isn't unprecedented. While there are only small pockets in the southeastern U.S. that are haze free, experts say the smoke poses less of a health concern for those who are farther away.
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NewsPlexus Media September 17, 2020

Climate change will force a new American migration
Wildfires rage in the West. Hurricanes batter the East. Droughts and floods wreak damage throughout the nation. Life has become increasingly untenable in the hardest-hit areas, but if the people there move, where will everyone go?
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NewsPlexus Media September 11, 2020

Climate change largely missing from campaign as fires rage
Historic fires are raging across the western United States ahead of what scientists say is the typical peak of wildfire season. Hurricane Laura devastated parts of the Gulf Coast last month, while swaths of Iowa are recovering from a derecho that brought hurricane force winds to the Midwest. The streak of disasters has left millions of Americans reeling. But it's barely had an impact on the campaign for the White House, in part because of the vulnerabilities it highlights for President Donald Trump and his Democratic challenger, Joe Biden.
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NewsPlexus Media September 10, 2020

UN report: Increased warming closing in on agreed upon limit
The world is getting closer to passing a temperature limit set by global leaders five years ago and may exceed it in the next decade or so, according to a new United Nations report. In the next five years, the world has nearly a 1-in-4 chance of experiencing a year that’s hot enough to put the global temperature at 2.7 degrees (1.5 degrees Celsius) above pre-industrial times, according to a new science update released Wednesday by the U.N., World Meteorological Organization and other global science groups.
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NewsPlexus Media September 10, 2020

6 Western states blast Utah plan to tap Colorado River water
Six states in the U.S. West that rely on the Colorado River to sustain cities and farms rebuked a plan to build an underground pipeline that would transport billions of gallons of water through the desert to southwest Utah. In a joint letter Tuesday, water officials from Arizona, California, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico and Wyoming urged the U.S. government to halt the approval process for the project, which would bring water 140 miles from Lake Powell in northern Arizona to the growing area surrounding St. George, Utah.
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NewsPlexus Media September 10, 2020

Think 2020's disasters are wild? Experts see worse in future
Freak natural disasters — most with what scientists say likely have a climate change connection — seem to be everywhere in the crazy year 2020. But experts say we’ll probably look back and say those were the good old days, when disasters weren’t so wild. “It’s going to get A LOT worse,” Georgia Tech climate scientist Kim Cobb said Wednesday. “I say that with emphasis because it does challenge the imagination. And that’s the scary thing to know as a climate scientist in 2020.”
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NewsPlexus Media September 8, 2020

Helicopters pull more people from burning California forest
Helicopters flew through dense smoke Tuesday to rescue scores more people from wildfires as wind-fanned flames kept chewing through bone-dry California after a scorching Labor Day weekend that saw a dramatic airlift of more than 200.
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NewsPlexus Media September 5, 2020

EPA chief pledges more cleanups, less focus on climate
Environmental Protection Agency chief Andrew Wheeler on Thursday defended the Trump administration's record on protecting the nation's air and water and said a second term would bring a greater focus on pollution cleanups in disadvantaged communities and less emphasis on climate change. In a speech commemorating the 50th anniversary of the EPA's founding, Wheeler said the agency was moving back toward an approach that had long promoted economic growth as well as a healthy environment and drawn bipartisan support.
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NewsPlexus Media September 3, 2020

Oil companies accused of wanting to dump plastics in Africa
The oil industry has asked the United States to pressure Kenya to change its world-leading stance against the plastic waste that litters Africa, according to environmentalists who fear the continent will be used as a dumping ground. The request from the American Chemistry Council, whose members include major oil companies, to the Office of the United States Trade Representative came as the U.S and Kenya negotiate what would be the first U.S. bilateral trade deal with a country in sub-Saharan Africa.
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NewsPlexus Media September 3, 2020

UN agency laments summer's 'deep wound' to Earth's ice cover
The United Nations weather agency says this summer will go down for leaving a “deep wound” in the cryosphere — the planet’s frozen parts — amid a heat wave in the Arctic, shrinking sea ice and the collapse of a leading Canadian ice shelf.
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NewsPlexus Media August 21, 2020

Record melt: Greenland lost 586 billion tons of ice in 2019
Greenland lost a record amount of ice during an extra warm 2019, with the melt massive enough to cover California in more than four feet (1.25 meters) of water, a new study said. After two years when summer ice melt had been minimal, last summer shattered all records with 586 billion tons (532 billion metric tons) of ice melting, according to satellite measurements reported in a study Thursday. That's more than 140 trillion gallons (532 trillion liters) of water.
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NewsPlexus Media August 21, 2020

Thunberg, fellow activists press Merkel over climate action
Young activists, including Swedish teenager Greta Thunberg, held talks Thursday with German Chancellor Angela Merkel to press their demands for tougher action on curbing climate change and to get their cause back on the political agenda. Thunberg, 17, Luisa Neubauer, 24, of Germany and Belgians Anuna de Wever van der Heyden, 19, and Adélaïde Charlier, 19, were accompanied by a handful of climate protesters as they arrived at the chancellery in Berlin, the first talks the youth activists have held with a head of government since the start of the pandemic.
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NewsPlexus Media August 21, 2020

Death Valley's brutal 130 degrees may be record if verified
California sizzled to a triple-digit temperature so hot that meteorologists need to verify it as a planet-wide high mark. Death Valley recorded a scorching 130 degrees (54.4 degrees Celsius) Sunday, which if the sensors and other conditions check out, would be the hottest Earth has been in more than 89 years and the third-warmest ever measured.
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NewsPlexus Media August 18, 2020

US approves oil, gas leasing plan for Alaska wildlife refuge
The Trump administration gave final approval Monday for a contentious oil and gas leasing plan on the coastal plain of Alaska's Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, where critics worry about the industry's impact on polar bears, caribou and other wildlife. The next step, barring lawsuits, will be the actual sale of leases. Development — should it occur — is still years away.
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NewsPlexus Media August 15, 2020

$205M in BP spill money for Louisiana coastal restoration
Louisiana is getting another $205 million in BP oil spill money to restore its coast. Most of that — $176 million — will use sediment dredged from the Mississippi River to build 1,200 acres (485 hectares) of marsh in Jefferson Parish.
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NewsPlexus Media August 14, 2020

Trump's EPA dumps methane emissions rule for oil, gas fields
President Donald Trump's administration is undoing Obama-era rules designed to limit potent greenhouse gas emissions from oil and gas fields and pipelines, formalizing the changes Thursday in the heart of the nation's most prolific natural gas reservoir and in the premier presidential battleground state of Pennsylvania. Andrew Wheeler, the Environmental Protection Agency administrator, signed the rollback of the 2016 methane emissions rule in Pittsburgh as the agency touted the Trump administration's efforts to "strengthen and promote American energy.”
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NewsPlexus Media August 10, 2020

Alpine glacier in Italy threatens valley, forces evacuations
Experts were closely monitoring a Mont Blanc glacier on Friday, a day after they evacuated 75 tourists and residents amid fears the glacier could soon break apart and crash into a popular Italian Alpine valley.
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NewsPlexus Media August 10, 2020

Canada's last intact ice shelf collapses due to warming
Canada's 4,000-year-old Milne Ice Shelf on the northwestern edge of Ellesmere Island had been the country's last intact ice shelf until the end of July when ice analyst Adrienne White of the Canadian Ice Service noticed that satellite photos showed that about 43% of it had broken off. She said it happened around July 30 or 31.
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NewsPlexus Media August 9, 2020

Mauritius scrambles to counter oil spill from grounded ship
Anxious residents of the Indian Ocean island nation of Mauritius stuffed fabric sacks with sugar cane leaves Saturday to create makeshift oil spill barriers as tons of fuel leaking from a grounded ship put endangered wildlife in further peril. The government has declared an environmental emergency and France said it was sending help from its nearby Reunion island. Satellite images showed a dark slick spreading in the turquoise waters near wetlands that the government called "very sensitive."
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NewsPlexus Media August 3, 2020

US officials seek limits on "habitat" for imperiled species
The Trump administration is moving to restrict what land and water areas can be declared as "habitat" for imperiled plants and animals — potentially excluding locations that species could use in the future as climate change upends ecosystems. An administration proposal obtained in advance by The Associated Press and publicly released Friday would for the first time define "habitat" for purposes of enforcing the Endangered Species Act, the landmark law that has dictated species protections efforts in the U.S. since 1973.
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NewsPlexus Media July 31, 2020

US energy use hit 30-year low during pandemic shutdowns
U.S. energy consumption plummeted to its lowest level in more than 30 years this spring as the nation’s economy largely shut down because of the coronavirus, federal officials reported Wednesday. The drop was driven by less demand for coal that is burned for electricity and oil that’s refined into gasoline and jet fuel, the U.S. Energy Information Administration said.
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NewsPlexus Media July 22, 2020

EPA finds plastic trash contaminates 2 remote Hawaii beaches
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has designated the waters of two remote beaches in Hawaii as contaminated by trash, forcing the state to address the persistent problem of plastic deposited on its coastlines by swirling Pacific Ocean currents. The decision will require authorities to establish a daily limit for the trash at the two locations, one of which is so notorious for collecting debris that some call it “Plastic Beach” or “Junk Beach.”
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NewsPlexus Media July 22, 2020

Rich Americans spew more carbon pollution at home than poor
Rich Americans produce nearly 25% more heat-trapping gases than poorer people at home, according to a comprehensive study of U.S. residential carbon footprints. Scientists studied 93 million housing units in the nation to analyze how much greenhouse gases are being spewed in different locations and by income, according to a study published Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Residential carbon emissions comprise close to one-fifth of global warming gases emitted by the burning of coal, oil and natural gas.
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NewsPlexus Media July 17, 2020

Climate change makes freak Siberian heat 600 times likelier
Nearly impossible without man-made global warming, this year’s freak Siberian heat wave is producing climate change’s most flagrant footprint of extreme weather, a new flash study says. International scientists released a study Wednesday that found the greenhouse effect multiplied the chance of the region’s prolonged heat by at least 600 times, and maybe tens of thousands of times.
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NewsPlexus Media July 16, 2020

Burger King addresses climate change by changing cows' diets
Burger King is staging an intervention with its cows. The chain has rebalanced the diet of some of the cows by adding lemon grass in a bid to limit bovine contributions to climate change. By tweaking their diet, Burger King said Tuesday that it believes it can reduce a cow's daily methane emissions by about 33%.
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NewsPlexus Media July 12, 2020

France ordered to fight pollution or pay millions in fines
France's highest administrative body ordered the government to take immediate measures to combat pollution in Paris and several regions or pay up to 20 million euros ($22.6 million) a year in fines. The Council of State's unusual ruling Friday came after the government failed to fulfill a 2017 order to reduce pollution in accordance with EU rules.
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NewsPlexus Media July 10, 2020

UN: World could hit 1.5-degree warming threshold by 2024
The world could see annual global temperatures pass a key threshold for the first time in the coming five years, the U.N. weather agency said Thursday. The World Meteorological Organization said forecasts suggest there's a 20% chance that global temperatures will be 1.5 degrees Celsius (2.7 Fahrenheit) higher than the pre-industrial average in at least one year between 2020 and 2024.
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NewsPlexus Media July 1, 2020

Dem climate plan would end greenhouse gas emissions by 2050
House Democrats on Tuesday unveiled a plan to address climate change that would set a goal of net-zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2050, while pushing renewable energy such as wind and solar power and addressing environmental contamination that disproportionately harms low-income and minority communities. The election-year plan backed by House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and other leaders is less ambitious than a sweeping Green New Deal that a group of progressive Democrats outlined last year to combat climate change and create thousands of jobs in renewable energy.
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NewsPlexus Media June 29, 2020

Russian nickel producer admits pollution in Arctic tundra
A Russian metallurgical company said Sunday that it improperly pumped wastewater into the Arctic tundra and that it has suspended the responsible employees. The statement from Nornickel is the second time in a month the company has been connected to pollution in the ecologically delicate region.
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NewsPlexus Media June 25, 2020

Germany bans single-use plastic straws, food containers
Germany is banning the sale of single-use plastic straws, cotton buds and food containers, bringing it in line with a European Union directive intended to reduce the amount of plastic garbage that pollutes the environment.
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